Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Friday, November 03, 2000

Front Page | National | Southern States | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Entertainment | Miscellaneous | Features | Classifieds | Employment | Index | Home

Entertainment | Previous | Next

Film Review: Thenali


A wholesome mix of rip-roaring action, witty dialogues and exotic locales, make watching R.K. Celluloids' ``Thenali'', directed by K. S. Ravikumar, a joyous session.

If `Crazy' Mohan's dialogue is an indisputable highpoint, so is Vikram Dharma's stunt concept, especially in the fight sequence in which a mouse instigates the entire gamboling of the hero. Again if Jayaram's essay is a display of commendable histrionics so is that of `Delhi' Ganesh, Ramesh Kanna, Jyothika and Devyani.

But the crowning glory of course, is Kamal Hassan himself as Thenali Soman from Sri Lanka. Ingenuity and innovativeness come in various forms in Kamal's films. Here it is the dialect that is different. The Sri Lankan Tamil language so beautifully imbibed and artistically presented, is a delectable treat. Another remarkable performance by the inimitable actor. Always adept at comedy, both the physical and dialogue-oriented kind, the enactment proves a cakewalk for Kamal Hassan.

Somehow at some points ``Thenali'' reminds you of ``Michael Madhana Kamarajan'' - probably the episodes that involve `Delhi' Ganesh and Ramesh Kanna following the hero.

Not everyone is mad, but mental aberrations may need treatment. Thenali Soman, is one such person, who is innocent yet astute, normal yet obsessed with fixations and fears. He seeks Dr. Kailash's (Jayaram) help and follows him to Kodaikanal where the doctor is holidaying with his family. Kailash's wife Jalaja (Devyani) and sister Janaki (Jyotika) take kindly to the innocent man but the doctor wants him out of the way. What follows is a series of ploys that Kailash adopts to send his patient back to Chennai and Thenali's knack of always bouncing back. Logic has no place in the story, which is only meant to make you laugh.

The humorous paradigms and spoonerisms add to the healthy humour of ``Crazy'' Mohan's dialogues. A. R. Rahman's compositions include a couple of foot-tapping numbers.

Jayaram's depiction of humour, though slightly overdone at times, shows his prowess as an excellent mimic and his astounding talent for comedy. A laugh riot for the entire family.

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

Send this article to Friends by E-Mail


Section  : Entertainment
Previous : Film Review: Piriyamanavalae
Next     : Film Review: Vaanavil

Front Page | National | Southern States | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Entertainment | Miscellaneous | Features | Classifieds | Employment | Index | Home

Copyrights © 2000 The Hindu

Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu