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Supreme Being's true nature

CHENNAI SEPT. 22 . Man is a bundle of contradictions, with the good and evil constantly at war within him. But the Divine Power is an epitome of grace and is even ready to offer protection and succour to devotees who hold on to virtuous living. The Law of Justice clearly states that true selflessness is a highly desirable conduct, wherein a devotee prays for Divine help for the common good of mankind.

Undertaking a task without expectations of reward is the ideal — a tree absorbs heat and offers shelter, fruits and flowers to one and all. The pure, sweet water of a river sustains myriad forms of life while animals such as cow live only for the benefit of others. There are numerous such examples through which God delineates the laws of living. Man should also be at the service of humanity.

One may feel that following a principle of non-involvement and non-interference is commendable, said Sri P.M. Vijayaraghava Sastrigal in his discourse. Actually such an attitude is nothing but selfishness. Life is full of challenges and he who upholds high principles, entertains noble thoughts and remains on the path of virtue despite serious tests, is said to have "evolved". In such a state, if one wants to reach God, the latter would welcome the devotee unto Him.

Such is the Lord's benignity that He never gets angry, no matter what the provocation is. In His manifestations, God's seeming ire at the demons is nothing but pretence, verily like actors using an external tool to authenticate a tearful scene. The Supreme Being's true nature is one of perpetual kindness — that is not an act. A case in pursuit is Brahma's sport with the Lord when for a year he "hid" all the calves and young cowherds of Brindavan. Yet Krishna assumed all their forms alleviating any distress to others.

A visibly moved Brahma saluted the worshipful Lord, hailing His transcendental spirit in a hymn, paying tributes to Him and His devotees: "There are some who without struggling in the path of knowledge (Jnana) spend their time in hearing in humility about Your excellences and their very breath is saturated with devotional fervour; such devotees are dear even to You. There are those who abandon the path of devotion and strive for mere attainment of knowledge. Such an approach is a fruitless labour, akin to husking the chaff of paddy." The prayer further states that whole-hearted devotion makes a person eligible for salvation as if it were his heritage.

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