Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Jan 19, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Karnataka
News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary |

Karnataka - Bangalore Printer Friendly Page   Send this Article to a Friend

Poets exhibit unity in diversity

By Our Staff Reporter

BANGALORE, JAN. 18. The poem flows from the heart of the poet. It is through the lines that he portrays the world around him. Be it Kashmir, river grid, drought, challenges facing the youth, and the state of country. Language does not matter either. It could be in Sanskrit, Assamese, Tamil, Konkani or Urdu.

This came to the fore at the National Symposium of Poets conducted by the All India Radio (AIR) here on Friday. This annual event was held for the second time in South India. It was held in Hyderabad in 2001. AIR started this annual event in 1954.

The stage suited the occasion. There were 18 poets on the left side and 15 writers on the right, who translated the poems in Hindi for the audience.

Inayath Gul from Jammu and Kashmir, in his poem, "12 years", narrated the beauty of the State and its problems. He likened people to birds. "Innocent birds have been taken across the border. They have been jailed inside the cages." Mohammed Iqbal in his Tamil poem gave an "ECG map" of the world. The world, he said, had become polluted. The land, the air, and even the religious institutions had become polluted. "The acts of preventing felling of trees and the process of interlinking of rivers will be welcomed by the next generation with flowers," he said.

Nukaram Prasad Reddy went into the heart of drought-affected farmers to render "Varsha Swapnam" (dream about rainfall) in Telugu. James Fernandez recited a Konkani poem expressing his concern at the lack of humaneness among the public. P.R.Laxman Rao in his Kannada poem narrated the tale of "Columbus" praying God to bestow salvation with bent knees in the ship, which is in the midst of the sea. But it was the "gazal" from Mohammed Ali Musarampuri from Rampur, Uttar Pradesh, portraying the cause of unity in diversity, which was most impressive. He said: "Hai nishane juda juda lekin teer sab ek kaman ke hai" (Though the target is different for all of us, the arrows are from the same quiver).

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Karnataka

News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary | Updates: Breaking News |


News Update


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Copyright 2004, The Hindu. Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu