Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Apr 05, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Karnataka
News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary |

Karnataka - Bidar Printer Friendly Page   Send this Article to a Friend

Development never mattered in Aurad

By Rishikesh Bahadur Desai

BIDAR, APRIL 4. Bad roads, water scarcity, and lack of telephone connections are the issues that bother the people of Aurad. Aurad has been classified as the third most backward taluk in the State by the High Power Committee for Redressal of Regional Imbalances, headed by D.M. Nanjundappa. Students here have been performing below par in the Secondary School Leaving Certificate and Pre-University Course examinations. The percentage of population of Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes is nearly 43 and most of them live below the poverty line. The road to Aurad is notorious for its bad condition. The district protocol describes the Bidar-Aurad road as "non-motorable".

VIPs touring the district are made to take a detour through Udgir in Maharashtra.

Lack of a demanding electorate is said to be the reason for this state of affairs here.

Till the Eighties, most of the time of the voters used to debate whether Aurad should become a part of Maharashtra or remain with the State.

In recent elections, personal loyalties determined the fate of the candidates. Development had never been an issue in the elections here.

The elections were always fought on the lines of Kannada vs. Marathi. Politicians whipped up feelings of linguistic chauvinism o attract voters. Bapurao Ekambekar of the Maharashtra Ekikaran Samiti (MES) was elected once and in almost all the other elections, nominees of that party have finished second. Leaders like the former minister, late Manikrao Patil, sought votes stating that they were Kannadigas.

Only the 1999 election was a straight fight between two Kannadigas, the former minister, Gurupadappa Nagamarapalli, and member of the previous Assembly, Gundappa Vakil. Since then, elections have been used to settle personal scores. Followers of these two leaders have largely dominated the political scene here. Baburao, a follower of Mr. Nagamarpalli, in the latter's hometown of Nagamarapalli, said that despite lack of basic amenities, every one in the village was happy that a man from their village had become a "State-level leader".

That there is not even a phone connection in some of the surrounding villages never bothered them.

Narahari Jadhav, in-charge of Mr. Vakil's campaign in Ekamba and surrounding villages, said that for many people like him, the person was more important than the party.

The atmosphere in Aurad is so charged that even casual conversation about election turns into a heated discussion.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Karnataka

News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary | Updates: Breaking News |


News Update


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Copyright 2004, The Hindu. Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu