Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Friday, Jun 18, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Karnataka
News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary |

Karnataka Printer Friendly Page   Send this Article to a Friend

Industries offered help to control pollution

By Our Staff Reporter

BANGALORE, JUNE 17. Industrialists in the State will now get technical help in meeting environmental standards from the Karnataka State Pollution Control Board (PCB). The PCB is also ready to offer short-term training on setting up effluent treatment plants (ETPs).

These measures are part of what the new PCB Chairman, Bhoomanand Maney, a former industrialist himself, calls a more proactive approach to tackling industrial pollution. He said this at a seminar on "Industry and Environment - Towards a Sustainable Relationship" organised by the PCB, the Greater Mysore Chamber of Industry (GMCI) and the Centre for Sustainable Development (CSD) here on Wednesday.

Mr. Maney stressed that few industries met PCB standards on treating wastes. But the PCB's problem was that it had to implement Central and State laws and directives from the Supreme Court. "We are caught in between," he said.

Industries had mushroomed on the outskirts of Bangalore. Highly polluting ones such as those involved in electroplating, textiles, tie and dye and agarbathi manufacture had come up in residential areas. "Residents complain, but the industries say they have no money to invest in ETPs." Private industrial estates were another headache. They were unrecognised and the board had no jurisdiction over them, he said.

Sector-wise industries were the answer. "Cluster highly polluting industries, and we can help them set up a common treatment facility," he said. The PCB was working with Bangalore Mahanagara Palike to set up a hazardous-waste treatment plant. "That will take a year," Mr. Maney added.

K.R. Gopinath, founder of the KRG Foundation for Rainwater Harvesting, said often industries set up factories without checking if there was potential for water in an area. "And once land is paved over, it cannot absorb water," he said. Rainwater harvesting on one acre could yield 30 lakh to 40 lakh litres of water a year. "Involve hydrogeologists in planning," he urged.

M.K. Ramachandra, chairman of the GMCI Industries Committee, and the GMCI president, Indra Prem Menon, spoke.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Karnataka

News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary | Updates: Breaking News |


News Update


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Copyright 2004, The Hindu. Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu