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Team to track down traffic violators

By P.Oppili

CHENNAI, JUNE 21. You might have seen traffic police personnel manning signals diligently noting down numbers of vehicles that jump signals. What happens after that?

The constables note down the vehicle number in a book, called `B' diary, with details of place of violation, time, date and type of vehicle. Senior officials say that at the end of the day the noted numbers are fed into computer at the police control room, which generates a challan. It is served on the vehicle-user, after tracing the violator's address.

Once the challan is served, the violator must pay the fine in one of the five places mentioned in the challan.

But it is not as simple as it sounds. As most vehicle-users do not effect the change of address in the registration certificate, tracing the violators is difficult.

Details not updated

Though the police master computer has a database on over 55 lakh addresses, including about 18 lakhs in Chennai alone, most addresses are not updated, as Regional Transport Offices are not intimated about the address change.

Even after a second-hand sale, vehicle details such as change of ownership and the new address are not entered in the registration book.

Above all, many violators do not respond to challans.

In an attempt at overcoming the problem, the police recently started delivering the challans through courier.

G.U.G. Sastry, Joint Commissioner, Traffic, says over 360 vehicles violated rules more than 10 times.

A team has been formed to track the vehicles. Once the task is completed, they will concentrate on the vehicles challaned five times or more.

Most vehicles booked for violating rules more than 10 times are autorickshaws, followed by vans and lorries. Motorcycles come last.

A senior police officer said the existing fine of Rs. 50 is too less for jumping signal.

The Transport department should generate and update data at the earliest, preferably within a time frame, and impose a penalty for non-compliance.

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