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dated August 16, 1954: Asia on the march: Nehru

Speaking from the ramparts of Delhi's Red Fort on the occasion of the seventh anniversary of the country's Independence Day on August 15, Prime Minister Nehru declared that Asia was on the march and the time had long passed when any country could rule over another anywhere in the world. "Whether anybody likes it or not, the time has long passed when any country could continue to retain her colonial hold over another, anywhere by force. If any nation still thinks that it can continue to dominate others, then it has neither understood the present day world nor the mind and heart of Asia." Earlier, Mr. Nehru unfurled the National Flag on the Fort ramparts. He referred to Goa thrice in his half-hour speech and said, "Our country has become completely free politically, except for a small part which is still under foreign domination. I am quite certain that this part will also become free. It will become free because of the change in the current of world affairs and because of our own determined resort. When India resolves and crores of her people determine that these small foreign possessions should become free, then we shall certainly fulfil this resolve. It is inconceivable that any tiny bit of territory on our soil should remain under colonial rule when our vast land has become free. Goa shall be liberated and integrated with free India." Referring to Pakistan, Mr. Nehru said that often "our brothers" in Pakistan became angry or unhappy with India. "We have many problems outstanding between India and Pakistan. But we have no desire to solve them through war. I have repeated from this very place that we want to establish relations of love and friendship with our brothers in Pakistan. We want to be on the friendliest terms with them because Pakistan is our neighbour and neither India nor Pakistan will benefit if they quarrel with each other. This, however, does not mean that we should depart out of fear from what we consider matters involving our self-respect."

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