Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Saturday, Aug 21, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Andhra Pradesh
News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary |

Andhra Pradesh Printer Friendly Page   Send this Article to a Friend

Pushkaram pilgrims may flock to ancient temple

By S. Ramu

WADAPALLY (NALGONDA DT.), AUG. 20. Nestled on top of a hill in the middle of the confluence of the Krishna and Musi rivers, the Sri Meenakshi Agastyeswara Swamy temple in this tiny village in Damaracharla mandal is of spiritual and historical prominence. Known as the Kasi of the South it remained a symbol of `saranaagatha rakshana' (protecting the asylum seeker) and `tyagam' (sacrifice).

Discovery in 1377

Legend has it that maharishi Agastya reached the place in the Treta yuga carrying idols of Lord Siva and Keshava in a specially designed carrier, which is called kaavadi in local parlance. He was in search of a place to build a sanctum for them. When he reached Wadapally one day, it was time for his evening rituals. He handed over the kaavadi to a shepherd before rushing to have a bath in the nearby Krishna.

The shepherd, who was in a hurry to go home, placed the carrier on top of a hillock and disappeared from the scene. The worried Agastya tried to lift the carrier to set off on his journey but in vain.

Then a voice told him that the gods wanted to remain there, as it was a place of spiritual prominence because of the confluence of the Krishna and Musi rivers. Later, the Sivalingam was discovered during the reign of the Reddy kings in 1377 and a temple was constructed for Lord Siva.

Strange phenomenon

The significance of the Lingam in this temple is that water oozes from two holes on top it, irrespective of the seasons. The Lingam looks as if someone had removed its top by using both the hands. Another legend has it that a bird, which was being hunted by a tribal, sought Lord Siva's asylum in the sanctum.

When the tribal insisted him to leave the bird to satiate his hunger, Siva offered the flesh of his brain instead. Then the tribal tugged the top of the Lingam with his hands.

According to Dachavaram Sambasiva Sarma, the temple priest, Adi Shankaracharya visited the place to "unearth'' the reason behind the water from the Lingam.

In the light of such mythological importance, Wadapally has been attracting lakhs of devotees during the Pushkarams. "We are expecting 40,000 to 50,000 pilgrims per day. In the last Pushkarams, on one Sunday, about 1 lakh devotees had a holy dip at the confluence,'' the temple's executive officer, Regatte Ravinder Reddy, said.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Andhra Pradesh

News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary | Updates: Breaking News |


News Update


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Copyright 2004, The Hindu. Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu