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Colleges asked to remit entire fee to Govt.

By Raviprasad Kamila

MANGALORE, OCT. 3. Managements of some government-aided colleges in the coastal belt are contemplating moving the court if the State Government did not withdraw its order issued recently which asked first grade colleges to remit the entire tuition fee amount collected from the students to the Government exchequer.

The college managements have sought the support of principals of first grade colleges in this regard, sources told The Hindu on Sunday.

Amendment

The Government, after amending the Karnataka Education Act, issued an order through the Department of Collegiate Education recently, which asked first grade colleges to remit the entire tuition fee to the Government. Earlier, sources said, of the total tuition fee collected, managements had to remit only half of the amount to the Government.

The managements could use the rest of the amount for managing the colleges. This was in practice following an agreement reached between the Government and managements in 1977.

Till then (1977), the Government was releasing its annual grant to private-aided colleges in one instalment in a year. The managements were paying salary to teachers from that amount.

Paying salary

The system of paying salaries directly to teachers came into being after 1977, following a decision taken by the then Chief Minister, Devaraj Urs, sources said.

The late Urs had taken the decision after it came to light that some managements were not paying salary to their teachers properly.

Hence an agreement to this effect (direct salary payment to teachers from the Government) was reached in 1977, where it was also agreed that the colleges should remit half of the total tuition fee collected from students and they could utilise the rest of the amount for managing the colleges.

Managements `shocked'

But the recent decision has shocked both the managements and principals. It would affect the existence of many colleges, sources said.

They said that the Government has reduced its grant to private aided colleges except for minority institutions since 1987 as an austerity measure.

In majority of private aided colleges, the teachers who joined the service from 1987, were paid salaries by the managements.

Except minority educational institutions, other private aided institutions had to bear the teachers' salary either from the tuition fee collected from students or from donations.

A case in point is a reputed educational institution in Mangalore. Of the 30 teachers in the college, only two are getting their salary from the Government. The rest, both permanent and temporary, are paid by the management.

If the college had to remit the entire tuition fee amount to the government, it would affect the functioning of the college, sources said.

New courses

After 1987, the Government had taken a stand not to provide grant (fund) to new courses. Hence, if colleges had to start new courses, the entire burden is to be borne by them. It would make new courses costlier.

The Government's decision could give scope for managements to increase the donation amount and collect more amount in the form of other fees from students to meet the shortage of funds.

Principals' concern

Meanwhile, the Association of First Grade College Principals of Mangalore University, which met here recently, expressed concern over the Government's decision.

Speaking to The Hindu , the secretary of the association, K. Devaraj, said that the association felt that private educational institutions, especially in rural areas, would find it difficult to continue if the Government did not withdraw its decision.

The decision of the government also violated the 1977 agreement, he said.

The meeting opined that the Government had taken "one-sided decision."

The meeting, in which principals from Dakshina Kannada, Udupi and Kodagu districts participated, appealed to the State Government to withdraw its order.

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