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Cricket coaches course begins

By Our Sports Reporter

HYDERABAD, DEC. 9. A six-day coaches course under the guidance of former Test cricketers Lalchand Rajput and Arshad Ayub began at the Visakha International Cricket Stadium (Uppal) here on Thursday. Being held under the aegis of the National Cricket Academy about 30 candidates, mostly former Ranji players, are attending the course.

This is part of BCCI's endeavour to ensure better quality and uniformity throughout the country. A comprehensive written examination will be conducted besides testing their skills on the field. Dr. Kinjal Suratwala will be highlighting the importance of physical fitness not just for players but also coaches.

There will be reorientation courses every six months when there would be review of the improvement of these coaches.

Rajput said the primary purpose was to avoid dichotomy in the coaching methods from different regions. "What is normally happening is that after a stint with the NCA most players are forced to change their style as per the wishes of the coaches back home. This we wanted to avoid for better results," he said.

The coaches will also be informed on the need for good communication skills besides stressing on how to motivate the player and come down to the level of the player's understanding to put the idea across. "Gone are the days when the coach can consider himself as boss. He has to be receptive to genuine ideas and try to incorporate them in the coaching classes," asserted Rajput.

Ayub said that the idea was to make the net sessions more effective and interesting. A player has to be engaged in some aspect of training — fielding, batting or bowling — throughout the session instead of the old style of relaxing after a brief bowling or batting stint. "Definitely, we are picking up some of the salient features from the Australian style like those rigorous drills in different aspects. But we cannot expect a drastic change overnight," he explained.

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