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Decline in values

Sir, — The incident involving a Delhi schoolboy who allegedly filmed his intimate moments with a girl on his mobile phone camera and forwarded it to his friends shows the decline in moral values among the young.

No doubt the young are more intelligent today and their exposure is much more than what it used to be earlier. But what is success without discipline?

Lalitha Chandrasekar,
Madurai, T.N.

Sir, — The incident shows that teenagers want to know more about sex. In our society, sex has always been taboo and discussion on it is suppressed. Most of the children come to know about it through friends or porn movies or the Internet. Sometimes, wrong information is passed on. Sex education should be made compulsory in schools.

Pankaj Kumar,
Chennai

Sir, — With our culture coming under the influence of the West, our entertainment industry has opened up. This has led to confusion and anxiety among teenagers. With adults not willing to talk about sex openly, the youngsters end up committing mistakes. There is need to educate teenagers about this all-important aspect of life.

Sarangadhara Sinha,
Hyderabad

Sir, — Incidents such as the MMS scandal are indeed a serious challenge to society. But mandatory sex education in schools is not the solution. Any logical thinking would show that such incidents are not the result of curiosity. They are the offshoot of over-exposure to suggestive images in our films, and in the print media. In fact, if sex education is imparted explicitly, it will only make our teenagers drift more towards experimentation.

Ashutosh Kumar Agarwal,
New Delhi

Sir, — The MMS scandal is only the tip of the iceberg. If they are not filming the incident, it does not mean teenagers are not overly interested in exploring their new energies.

The problem cannot be solved by preventing them from using cell phones and watching some TV channels. Parents should spend more time with their children. And what is shown in the media needs to be regulated.

Venkat Manthripragada,
Hyderabad

Sir, — It is due to the lack of moral education in most schools that youngsters end up indulging in such activities. Modern day living with its endless materialistic pursuit sends a wrong signal to the young mind that money can do anything.

Our electronic media also play a negative role in projecting only cinematic values without any responsibility towards society.

V. Sundararajan,
Chennai

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