Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Friday, Dec 24, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Miscellaneous
News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous | Engagements |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary |

Miscellaneous - Religion Printer Friendly Page   Send this Article to a Friend

Devotee's unique status

CHENNAI, DEC. 24. The law of virtue is a large canvas. There are many angles to the principles of dharma and in the Kali Yug many people may find it difficult to uphold every facet of it. However, scholars are equivocal in stating that the basic premise of this universal law recommends that whatever a person `takes' from the world, he has to give back in order to reach his spiritual potential. The epics and puranas underscore this aspect by casting humanity's role models in circumstances familiar to man.

The four sons of Dasaratha embodied four variegated principles of dharma, and Shatrugna's role is in many ways an unparalleled one, said Smt. Jaya Srinivasan in her discourse. He had waged only one war, yet he was hailed as the `one without enemies.' What mighty armies had he conquered then, one may ask. He had conquered the ultimate enemy, the senses, specially his eyes which refused to look upon anything except his brother, Bharata. Wherever Rama was, all eyes were turned towards Him, yet his youngest sibling had eyes for none other Bharata who was himself an ardent follower of Rama, with no independent thoughts of his own, held Rama's wishes as his own, in short a perfect devotee. In our spiritual ethos the servitors of God command a unique status. When Lord Subrahmanya quizzed the aged poet philosopher Avvaiyar on the largest in the world, her logical reply placed a devotee at the nadir, since the Supreme is `imprisoned' in the heart of a true savant. Bakta Surdas was born blind, yet his inner love of God enabled him to `see' the Lord in all His glory as evidenced by the verse ``Kasturi Thilaka''. In another of his compositions written after a mystical experience of being pulled out of a well by `Bala' Krishna, he asks ``you may let go of my hand, but can you escape from my heart?'' It is sometimes asked by some aspirants as to the selection process by God in rushing to the aid of His devotee. Why did the Supreme Being rush to alleviate the distress of an elephant when there were countless other devotees, and that too in such a rush? Gajendra, by virtue of its unfailing pious offering of a garland was indeed beloved to the Lord, but in rescuing it, He offered liberation to the crocodile first.

Some may wonder at this, but commentators point out that although the elephant surrendered to God, the crocodile had caught and held on to the leg of the prime devotee, and as such qualified for salvation.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Miscellaneous

News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous | Engagements |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary | Updates: Breaking News |


News Update


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Copyright 2004, The Hindu. Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu