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Corporate colleges start out early

R. Ravikanth Reddy

Students being wooed even before SSC results


  • Bright students offered incentives
  • Total fee exemption or discount
  • Free hostel facility
  • Parents, students a happy lot

    HYDERABAD: Catch them young, says an adage. It perfectly suits corporate colleges' latest plan to attract talent and toppers to their institutions.

    Unlike previous years, representatives of corporate colleges have targeted prospective toppers in the 10th examination even before the results are out.

    Students with good academic record and those considered to get top ranks in their respective schools are being targeted with incentives like free education or huge concessions, depending on their scores. Households are seeing regular visitors from colleges even as students are nervous waiting for the results.

    A student of St. Joseph's School, who resides in Musheerabad, has been offered a free seat by all corporate colleges, expecting him to get a good rank. There are several others in the same league.

    "Lot of my friends in other schools have also been offered similar packages," he says.

    Where did they get the address? "Some of my friends gave the information." "I have also forwarded similar information about my friends," he says. Colleges are particular about the students' performance and interest in mathematics and science subjects.

    New trend

    Interestingly, this is the first time that colleges are approaching students even before the results are out. "This is a new trend," agrees a representative of a college. "It is easy to catch them now than after the results as some top colleges would take them away with high incentives," he adds. Colleges find this a safe, but productive measure with the Government banning advertisements.

    Parents look pretty happy with the sudden importance given to their wards and also because it is not pinching on their pocket. They admit offers are irresistible as they can save Rs. 20,000 to Rs. 30,000, based on the marks.

    "The colleges have been providing good results in EAMCET, so I have asked my daughter to give a thought," says Narender, an engineer with a private firm.

    Interestingly, nobody seems to have any objection to these inducements. "If some good college is offering me free education, why should I deny?" asks Arun. "It works both ways," he says. "What's wrong in offering free education? It's a service," argues a teacher of a corporate college. "Everyone wants good students, so do we," he contends.

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