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There is no shortcut to success

N.J. Nair

An interactive session with actress Urvasi helped them view cinema on a wider frame. Of course, the youngsters had no dearth of ideas. And they did not mince words when it came to voicing their concern over some disturbing trends on the celluloid.



IN CHILDREN'S WORLD: The noted actress Urvasi arriving for an interactive session organised by the Kerala State Institute for Children's Literature in Thiruvananthapuram on Friday. Photo: C. Ratheesh Kumar

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: Cinema is no more just a means of entertainment for the younger generation. They look forward to watching films with a message and songs with meaningful lyrics and soulful tunes.

A group of children who gathered at the Sanskrit College here under the aegis of the Institute of Children's Literature for an interactive session with the actress Urvasi did not mince words when it came to voicing their ideas about cinema, music and art.

The children said they were pained to watch films that failed to rise up to their expectations. The actress also enjoyed the tête-à-tête but expressed her limitations when it came to fulfilling their wishes as she was also part of the industry.

Urvasi said that while Tamil and Telugu films had adopted the natural style of acting that was popular in Malayalam and true-to-life themes, Malayalam directors were vying with one another to experiment with worn out formulae.

"Can you ever see youngsters dancing and singing in the street or on the campus? But such things have come to stay in Malayalam cinema and we have to compromise considering the problems gripping the industry," she said.

Most of the children felt that not only the themes, but even the picturisation of songs was absurd. The splurge of colours and the fast numbers with meaningless lyrics are a bane. The youngsters felt the time had come for the industry to make films that conformed to the culture and tradition of the State.

Urvasi said that when she started her career, she had never nurtured such bold opinions about cinema. "It is good that you have such clear views, but you should also be aware of the real scenario in the industry. Producers are trying to sell story rights to other languages and they think of the business prospects while planning a film. We cannot ignore such realities."

The children also came out against the tear-jerkers being churned out by television channels. What is being passed off as comedy is often ridiculous. The serial-makers tend to take the audiences for granted.

Urvasi too shared their opinion. She explained her efforts to induce comic elements in her roles. She advised the younsters to be more sympathetic to their fellow beings. Her parting advice to them: there are no shortcuts to success.

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