Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Thursday, Jun 30, 2005

About Us
Contact Us
Tamil Nadu
News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous | Engagements |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary |

Tamil Nadu - Chennai Printer Friendly Page   Send this Article to a Friend

Afghan boy gets brain tumour treated at city hospital

Staff Reporter

Eight-year-old Kamrun was suffering from a condition called medulloblastoma



HOPE AT LAST: Eight-year-old Kamrun from Kabul, diagnosed with brain tumour, who was treated at K.J. Hospital in Chennai. — Photo: K.V. Srinivasan

CHENNAI: Eight-year-old Kamrun of Afghanistan, who spent nearly two months in Chennai at the K.J. Hospital receiving treatment for a brain tumour, left for Kabul on Wednesday on a happy note.

Seven months ago, Kamrun began vomiting and complained of headaches. Doctors in Kabul treated him, but the headaches became more frequent and he started vomiting blood. The United Nations Agency advised Kamrun's father, Ali Khan, employed at the United Nations terminal of the Kabul airport, to seek specialised medical help in Pakistan.

At Peshawar and Islamabad in Pakistan, Kamrun was diagnosed with medulloblastoma, a condition that affected Kamrun's sense of smell, hearing, speech and vision.

Medulloblastoma occurs in the area between the brain stem and cerebellum and is the most common primary central nervous system tumour that occurs in childhood.

Human brain produces cerebrospinal fluid providing nourishment to the body. The fluid circulates in the brain and is absorbed by the body. When the movement of the fluid is blocked, pressure builds up in the brain and results in the symptoms that Kamrun exhibited.

The treatment included radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery where tubes are inserted in the brain to route the fluid to the abdomen. "The fluid is not wasted as it is allowed to be absorbed by the body because of its nourishing properties," K. Jagadeesan, director of K.J. Hospital, said. The fluid will continue to flow into the body even in adulthood. "The aim is to reduce pressure in the brain and prevent affecting other parts and activities of the brain."

Kamrun was operated on on May 4, a day after he arrived in the city. He left for Kabul on Wednesday. He will have to continue chemotherapy at Kabul. "He has 50-60 per cent chances of being cured though his vision will take time to improve," said Paul Korath, the chief physician.

While the U.N. met travel and medical expenses, the hospital sponsored the surgery and the stay of Mr. Khan and Kamrun. Roy Memorial Centre provided radiotherapy. The surgery and treatment could have cost nearly Rs. 3.5 lakhs.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Tamil Nadu

News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous | Engagements |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary | Updates: Breaking News |


News Update


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Copyright 2005, The Hindu. Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu