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Computer that understands human language

K. Srinivas Reddy



NEW CREATION: Ayyappa Nagubandi, demonstrates the programme developed by his team. — Photo: P. V. Sivakumar

HYDERABAD: Deep Blue had indeed beaten Gary Kasparov in a game of chess. But in that fascinating match played in 1977, the supercomputer depended on its capability to process permutations and combinations of different moves. But can a computer understand and process human language -- the way we speak?

Ask the Hyderabad lad, Ayyappa Nagubandi. He breaks into a smile and says yes. Computers can certainly understand and process human language, at least in his office where he and his team at TrulyIntelligent Technologies, claim to have achieved a breakthrough in the area of Artificial Intelligence (AI).

Ayyappa says that his team managed to create a `contextual linguistic processing algorithm' and juxtaposed it with an automated search-and-learn programme. For users, that means that the programme can understand a question posed by them. The breakthrough is significant because presently systems depend only on computing-based and pre-defined business process language.

Take the case of an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). The interaction between the user and the ATM is only a guided interaction and the machine does not give the user an option to withdraw, say, half of the available balance. Or take the case of a search engine. It will automatically start searching websites for the keywords given. Mostly, all search engines return the same results. And if they cannot find information, they flash a message --Information is not found.

But the TI's new programme derives a meaning from the question, searches the available database and furnishes the answers.

And if the answer is not found in the database, it searches the net, downloads relevant information into the local machine and another software reads it, frames the correct answer and presents it to the user in an organised way.

Some fine-tuning

"It could take some more time for us to fine-tune the programme. The utility potential is too high. The self-learning contextual language processing capabilities will empower websites, information CDs, kiosks and search engines the next generation of interaction possibilities. It could even be a personal desktop assistant," Ayyappa explains.

His company will also be launching its first innovation -- a next generation email system through NowPos (short for Now Possible), backed by relevant Indian and international patents, trademarks and copyrights, he discloses.

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