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Custom-made entry tickets for one-off monuments

Mandira Nayar


NEW DELHI: The tallest minar in the city -- the Qutub -- might soon fit into your pocket.

With the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) planning to revamp the rather plain tickets at major monuments so that they are more colourful and informative, visitors will be able to take a little bit of the Capital's heritage home at least on paper.

"The tickets are certainly different from our usual ones. They will be more informative for one. There will be a write-up about the monument at the back and a picture of the monument in front. The idea is that these tickets should be such that tourists take them back and keep them as souvenirs as well as learn from them about the monument and its history,'' says a senior ASI official.

While the proposal is still at a preliminary stage, officials believe that once approved, the new tickets will be available at counters hopefully in a month.

A step towards adding more value to a visit, five monuments that are a must-see in every guide-book have been identified for new tickets in the first stage of the experiment -- Red Fort, Jantar Mantar, Purana Quila and the two World Heritage Sites, Humayun's Tomb and Qutub Minar.

The custom-made tickets for each monument have been designed by ASI officials themselves. With officials in different circles submitting their design for the ticket, they are being encouraged to think out of the box.

The final design of the tickets might not yet have been decided, but one thing is for certain: ASI is keen to ensure that these tickets are a far cry from the usual boring ones that are issued at monuments at present.

"The need to introduce new tickets at monuments has been felt for the past two or three years, but we have got around doing it only now. Other countries have specially designed tickets for their monuments that people want to preserve. We will test these tickets to see whether they are viable or not first in the Capital and then extend it to other parts of the country hopefully,'' says a senior official.

However, the financial details still have to be worked out. The entry price for the visitor might not increase, but for ASI the new tickets will probably be more expensive to print. They will also be computerised.

"We will print the tickets for each monument according to the figures we have for the number of tourists visiting the monuments. There are some monuments which are visited much more than others and then we will naturally need more tickets for them,'' say officials.

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