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Andhra Pradesh - Visakhapatnam Printer Friendly Page   Send this Article to a Friend

`Court verdict will not hurt junior colleges'

Staff Reporter

Vikas chief says quality not possible at low fee

VISAKHAPATNAM: "The alarm raised by certain sections of junior colleges in the State on the impact of the recent Supreme Court judgment is premature,'' Vikas Educational Institutions chairman T. Naga Prasad, said here on Tuesday.

He said that the management of some junior colleges had wrongly perceived the judgment, which stated clearly that unaided minority and non-minority institutions would have the absolute right to admit students of their choice through their own admission rules in engineering, medicine and other professional courses without Government interference.

``This would not hurt the Rs.200-crore `EAMCET industry and junior college business' as perceived by some,'' he said.

To date EAMCET had been the only qualifying examination for getting a seat in any engineering or medical college, Mr. Prasad said and added that the EAMCET setup might continue or private colleges might come out with their own merit criteria competitive examination.

`Order of the day'

At no stage would the colleges compromise on the student quality, as the final output and the selection of the students by the industries put the institutes in good light.

This should be the thinking of any focused college. In such an instance the junior colleges and the corporate colleges would stand to gain as the options for the merit qualifying examinations would not only increase but would also pave way for a more competitive environment, he felt.

``This might be taxing for the students but that's going to be the order of the day.''

On the growing feeling that the private engineering and medicine colleges would jack up their fees, he said: "At some point of time one should come to understand the fact that quality comes only with a price tag. If some of the focused colleges increase their fees it would only be for the benefit of the institution. The Central Government annually shells out over Rs.10 lakhs as subsidy for every IIT student. And that is the reason why the IITs are able to churn out gems and are considered among the top technology institutes in the world.''

Comparison to IIT

The Vikas group chief said that one could not expect a private institution to give the quality as that of an IIT or an IIM for the fees that were fixed by State Government.

``In a call centre the minimum salary for a below average student is Rs.10,000. How can one expect to have a good teacher for Rs.5,000? Institutions cannot pay more, as the fees collected are much below the break- even level. If the apex court judgment comes to force then colleges with focused management would definitely grow in standards within a short time, as they would have the funds and motivation to better their infrastructure,'' he said.

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