Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Sunday, Aug 28, 2005
Google

Karnataka
News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous | Engagements |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary |

Karnataka - Mangalore Printer Friendly Page   Send this Article to a Friend

A folk art and a religious vow

Special Correspondent

There is hard work behind the unique designs sported by the Huliveshadharis

MANGALORE: "Hulivesha" is in the air as part of the celebrations to mark Krishna Janmashtami in Mangalore. Going by the popular legend, Hulivesha is a popular folk art and a favourite among children. Children are seen as a representative of Krishna and to entertain them, it is believed that Hulivesha came into being.

Today this folk art has taken various social dimensions and some people argue it should be preserved for posterity. However, hard work goes behind wearing the Hulivesha. Fresh enamel paint is used to cover the bodies of the Huliveshadharis, says painter Nagesh of Mangalore. A commercial artist himself, Nagesh paints nearly 120 "tigers" for Janmashtami and Navarathri. It takes about an hour to paint each person and he has to create unique designs so that each person stands out. There are Patte Hulis (Royal Bengal tiger), Chitte Hulis (leopards) Sapura and Thora patte (young and old tigers). The paint sometimes causes a burning sensation on the skin.

However, the hardy veshadharis endure these difficulties just to be a part of the celebrations and earn some extra money in the holiday season. Some others do it as a part of a "Harake" (a religious vow). Some people invite a group of Huliveshadharis to their houses and watch them dance, for which they are usually paid in cash or kind. Once painted the Huliveshadharis have to keep the paint on for two days. They usually return to the painter for a touch up after the first day. Sometimes it is tough for the veshadharis who have to perform in the hot sun for hours, says Rama Anchan, an autorikshaw driver, who has taken a vow to wear a Hulivesha every year in the next seven years.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail



Karnataka

News: Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous | Engagements |
Advts:
Classifieds | Employment | Obituary | Updates: Breaking News |


News Update


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | The Hindu Images | Home |

Copyright 2005, The Hindu. Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu