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`Confusion prevails over use of digital evidence'

Staff Reporter

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: Whether digital evidence is accepted in legal procedures is still unclear, said N. Krishnan, Additional Director, Centre for Development of Advanced Computing, here on Saturday.

"The evidence obtained from the laptop of the suspects involved in the Parliament attack case was not accepted by the Supreme Court," he cited as an example.

Mr. Krishnan was speaking here at a two-day seminar on information security, organised by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in the city on Saturday.

Delivering a power-point presentation on `Cyber crimes, cyber forensics and technology,' Mr. Krishnan said that while information technology had been advancing for the benefit of mankind, certain individuals were personalising the advancements for their vested interests by committing conventional crimes with more ease and sophistication and `inventing' newer crimes with the aid of technology.

This had given rise to what was popularly known as `cyber crimes.' Governments world over are enacting new laws every day to combat these crimes, he said. According to him `definite punishment can act as a deterrent against cyber crimes.'

Earlier in the day, Y.V. Rao, senior manager, CISCO systems, who presented the topic `Building a self-defending network,' emphasised the need for creating a multiple layer of security system.

"Security should not be an option, but an integral part of a network system," he said.

"The networks today are confronted with a number of challenges such as viruses, worms, Trojans, botnets, malware and spy ware.

"What worked in the past cannot meet today's threats," he said. According to him, the protection envisaged must consider both known and unknown attacks.

"Irrespective of whether the access is through wire, wireless, dial-up or internal access system, all access methods must be secured.

"Attacks should be contained with minimal damage. A proactive and behaviour-based solution proved to be the best form of defence against the broadest range of attacks," he said.

Mr. Rao was of the view that most of the attacks taking place on networks were evolutionary in nature.

"It is like a human body, which is vulnerable to new diseases.

"An attack can be rid completely only if the characteristic trait of the attack is known."

However, he added that "most of the attacks take place because the systems are badly managed."

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