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Crimes against single working women on the rise

Special Correspondent

Most incidents occur on lonely stretches


BANGALORE: Nearly 900 women are victims of crime in the city each year.

The crimes range from purse and chain snatching to cheating and sexual violence.

Women are increasingly subject to violent crimes, according to the police.

Bangalore has a large number of single working women, many of whom travel alone or in groups at night. Women also line up at ATMs at late hours on weekends.

"Almost all such situations attract criminal elements, although we are happy that cases of molestation are not on the rise," says a senior police official.

Perhaps fearing the stringent punishment for sexual violence, most criminals are content with taking away money and valuables.

Except for the information technology sector, including BPOs and a few other companies, women employees are rarely provided company buses or vans to pick them up and drop them to and from work.

With long working hours in most companies, women often have to rely on buses or autorickshaws even after 9 p.m. Those with cars and two-wheelers are not much safe either.

There have been cases of women on two-wheelers being stopped and robbed at night. Most such incidents take place on ring roads and other lonely stretches.

While some IT companies have two-day weekends, they expect staff to work late Friday nights to complete pending projects.

"Every Friday night I need to go to an ATM to draw money and come out on the road with a lot of fear and anxiety," says Seema (27) who works for a firm in Koramangala.

Having learnt from bitter experience, she says many women like her drive long distances to reach ATMs that are located in crowded places such as shopping centres, as these are relatively safe.

It has become common for groups of single women to share apartments.

However, for reasons of economy or convenience, many such apartments are located in the suburbs, where police patrol less frequently.

Break-ins during the day and intruders during the night are risks that young women have to face.

However, many such crimes go unreported, as some of them say: "Going to the police is hassle."

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