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Method to improve attention span

Susan Muthalaly

Neuro feedback can help children to overcome problems Neuro feedback can help children with learning disorders to overcome problems


  • How to identify a child with ADD:
  • Accident-prone
  • Low energy
  • Extremely impulsive, routine is impossible
  • Child lies frequently
  • Illegible handwriting

    CHENNAI: N.S. Srinivasan says, "I teach people how to learn." His company, MOM - Mind Over Matter, uses technology to improve people's attention spans.

    He deals with people aged eight to 60 — from children with attention deficit disorders to chairmen of companies who want to learn to focus.

    His target clientele are children who are hyperactive or have dysfunctional attention spans.

    "Shouting at a child does not help, it is the nature of his brain."

    And with the technology he uses, "neuro feedback," the electrical potential of the brain is measured.

    He says one can train people to be good learners.

    Mr. Srinivasan, who has four Masters degrees, including in Western and Indian philosophies, has identified a link between happiness and learning. There are three types of happiness, he says.

    The first is instant where you are satisfied with immediate gratification, like when you fulfil the desire to eat chocolate. The second is happiness that comes from achieving short-term goals.

    An example of this would be companies who achieve the goals for the year.

    And finally, there is happiness associated with discovery, the highest of them all. This is the one that should be channelled for learning, says Mr. Srinivasan.

    His technology, explained simply, trains a person by pushing the kind of happiness they look for.

    Therefore, a child who looks for instant gratification can be trained to look for mid-term happiness and then the high associated with discovery, where he learns to question fundamentals.

    The rewards vary from watching a clip from a favourite cartoon to gifts.

    MOM has tied up with a few companies to sponsor the gifts.

    Mr. Srinivasan says the tricky thing about these learning disorders is they are hard to identify.

    But there are giveaways; fidgety children who are impulsive and have no poise usually suffer from these disorders.

    They are also usually selective about what they learn — a tricky sign since most people are that way.

    "But selectiveness is not a good thing during learning as the education system is integrated."

    MOM cannot treat people medically.

    When Mr. Srinivasan comes across a child with a serious problem, he puts the family on to the appropriate people. His system is more about moulding a person's outlook.

    It is a result of 40 years of research in the United States, United Kingdom and Canada.

    After he makes each assessment, he can use the databases in Canada, Sydney and Montreal to find similar cases and plan a solution for the problem.

    Call 044-55191948 or 9381008930 for details or to fix an appointment.

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