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Now Harry Potter turns to Hindi in India



SPELLBOUND: A group of physically-challenged children from Akshay Pratishthan, reading the Hindi translation `Harry Potter Aur Azkaban Ka Quaidi', after its release at the ongoing 17th World Book Fair, in New Delhi on Tuesday. -- Photo: Shiv Kumar Pushpakar

The book that has altered the rules of the publishing world is only likely to become bigger. While Harry Potter's phenomenon might be well established, he is now waving his wand to capture a larger audience. Turning to Hindi, the magical adventures of Hogwarts is now going local in India with "Harry Potter Aur Azkaban Ka Quaidi".

And with the most famous wizard in the world looking to cast his spell on a completely different set, he is set to break more than the usual records. Released at the New Delhi World Book Fair in the Capital on Tuesday by five children, the book has been published by Manjul Books. "Harry Potter books have been translated into 60 languages and have sold hundreds of millions of copies worldwide. We would be publishing the Hindi translation of the fourth book, `Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire', by June this year. Manjul also holds the rights for the Marathi, Gujarati and Malayalam editions of the books in this series,'' said Vikas Rakheja, Managing Director of Manjul Books. Bringing alive the intricately imagined world of J.K. Rowling is certainly no easy task. And it took the translator of the book, Sudhir Dixit, to ensure that the magic of the book was not lost in translation.

"The language had to be kept simple yet succinct, keeping in mind children's mind-set and the author's requirements. It took about seven months. I had to see the movie 10 times and read the book 15 times to get it just right. I also had to seek help of the Internet to look up for many difficult words," he said. -- Mandira Nayar

-- Mandira Nayar

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