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Waste from SIPCOT units affects village

Staff Reporter

Photo: M. Govarthan

Industrial waste from SIPCOT dumped along the Ingur - Perundrai RS Road is posing problems for residents. —

PERUNDURAI: Every month for the past four months land in Ingur is being pounded left, right and centre. The bombing comes from vehicles that move about stealthily in the night.

The vehicles that move stealthily are not in the air but on roads - vans - and what they drop are bags of solid waste, gathered as waste from processing industries in nearby SIPCOT industrial complex. All along the Ingur-Perundurai Railway Station Road one can easily spot bags of solid waste thrown every few feet. The bags have withered away and the solid waste is strewn all around.

Ingur panchayat president E. V. M. Nataraja Murthy laments, “Twice or thrice every month for the past few months, vehicles from processing industries from SIPCOT dump their waste here.” In short, the industries have turned the village a dump yard, he adds. A drive along the 6-km-long road suggests there are hundreds of such bags.

What the Ingur villagers fear is that once the rains come down, the waste will get dissolved to percolate the ground, affecting ground water, and thereafter agriculture activities. Mr. Murthy says he has written letters to the processors’ association, SIPCOT management as well as the district administration to no avail.

Handiwork

In response to the allegations, the Perundurai SIPCOT Textile Processors’ Association denies the act. “None of our members dump waste in the village, for we have provision to stock the waste. It could be the handiwork of tanners,” says P.K.M. Chandrasekar of the Association.

He says his association has appointed around 10 security guards and provided them with vehicles to monitor the discharge of effluents and solid waste, if any.

Mr. Chandrasekar suggests that if the chemical contents of the waste are tested, the cat would be out of the bag.

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