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‘Nanotechnology can make a difference’

Special Correspondent

– Photo: V. Sreenivasa Murthy

Following tradition: President of Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research C.N.R. Rao, Science and Technology Minister Ramachandra Gowda (centre) and IT Secretary M.N. Vidyashankar launching ‘Bangalore Nano – 2007’ in Bangalore on Wednesday.

Bangalore: Eminent scientist C.N.R. Rao said here on Wednesday that nanotechnology with the global business potential of nearly $ 3 trillion by the next decade has the potential to improve the quality of life for underprivileged in India too.

“Clean drinking water through nano filters and cheaper power from solar cells which could become smaller,” said Prof. Rao, honorary president, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore. “In the field of medical diagnostics, nano particles could power devices for medical imaging and DNA diagnosis and tissue engineering to treat burns,” Prof. Rao said speaking at the official launch of the first Bangalore Nano 2007, to be held here on December 6 and 7.

“While we may not be able to match the amounts spent by the U.S., China or Japan on nanotechnology research, the Union Government has made a beginning by a budgetary provision of Rs. 1,000 crore this year. About Rs. 100 crore will go to promote research, including a research centre in Bangalore,” Prof. Rao said.

Some research organisations like the Indian Institute of Science (IISc.) had matched research abroad by helping the JNCASR create “y-junction nano tubes” for which India had to depend on other countries till now.

“Research at the IISc. has showed the energy creation potential through molecular interaction in nano tubes and other predictable uses, 10 years from now, could include packing the contents of 100 DVDs into a device the size of a wrist watch. The commercial potential of nanotechnology was being used by only a handful of Indian companies,” Prof. Rao said.

Secretary to the Government, Department of IT and BT, M.N. Vidyashankar, said 15 acres of land would be required for this research centre and land was identified close to Jakkur.

The conference had been planned as a forum for interaction between industry and research organizations and would have two days of presentations, discussions and networking activities and talks by scientists invited from countries such as the U.S., which made the first scanning “tunnelling telescope” made by IBM to view atomic and molecular particles.

Minister for Science and Technology Ramachandra Gowda, who read out Chief Minister H.D. Kumaraswamy’s speech, said the Government too had made a modest start to encourage nano research, recognising its potential for applications with wide usage.

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