Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Sunday, Aug 29, 2010
ePaper | Mobile/PDA Version
Google



Andhra Pradesh
News: ePaper | Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous | Engagements |
Advts:
Retail Plus | Classifieds | Jobs | Obituary |

Andhra Pradesh Printer Friendly Page   Send this Article to a Friend

“It's like meeting of two nations”


Jaywant Naidu in a tête-à-tête with Yogendra Kalavalapalli on his recent work with Charlie Porter, a tribute to Tagore




Jaywant Naidu


It was on the night of May 22, in one of the opulent halls of Taj Krishna that Jaywant Naidu took a chance.

Only a few minutes earlier, he sat mesmerised by the sound of Jana Gana Mana flowing from an American's trumpet and barely had the concert ended, there he was, wondering if Charlie Porter, the trumpeter of the Charlie Porter Quartet would be interested in cutting an album with him.

The album would be a tribute to the great Indian polymath, Rabindranath Tagore.

“When I listened to him play, something really hit me. I was impressed; an American musician coming all the way to play our national anthem on a trumpet. After the concert was over, I proposed the idea to him. That same night, at 11 p.m. when I was about to leave, he called me and said yes.”

But they had to race against time. The trumpeter was on a tight schedule and had barely 36 hours to spare before catching his flight. Would they be able to make it?

Using his connections, Jaywant managed to get hold of a recording room in Keertana Studios the next day. “There was another recording going on then. But, they obliged to our request,” he says. The duo then played on the track for about four times together, Jaywant on his famed 21-string Jaywant guitar and Porter on his trumpet, before moving on to the video shoot.

His connections came into play again as he collaborated with director Ravi Gollapudi and photographer Raja to shoot the album, ‘Tribute to Tagore' in the well-manicured lawns of Ista Hyderabad. “In the little time we had, we did his portion of the shoot and the common shots. It was over in about an hour.”

It was only after Porter left that Jaywant began to breathe as he got down to the scissoring business, editing the album in earnest. “The editing took a lot of time,” he remarks. “It is about a two-and-a-half minute album but I had to sit on the editing table for nearly 30 hours.”

The album's fate seems enlaced with concerts. Incidentally, it was at another concert event that Jaywant had an opportunity to interact with acting U.S. Consul General Juliet Wurr who readily agreed to his request to launch the album.

“Some seniors who saw the video say it is not easy playing our national anthem so smoothly on a trumpet. It shows his calibre,” Jaywant sings a paean on Porter's trumpeting talents. “It is like a meeting of two minds, musicians and nations.”

The video can be viewed on video-sharing website YouTube.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail



Andhra Pradesh

News: ePaper | Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous | Engagements |
Advts:
Retail Plus | Classifieds | Jobs | Obituary | Updates: Breaking News |


News Update



The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | The Hindu ePaper | Business Line | Business Line ePaper | Sportstar | Frontline | Publications | eBooks | Images | Ergo | Home |

Copyright 2010, The Hindu. Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu