Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Sunday, Jan 30, 2011
ePaper | Mobile/PDA Version
Google



Karnataka

News: ePaper | Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous | Engagements |
Advts:
Retail Plus | Classifieds | Jobs | Obituary |

Karnataka Printer Friendly Page   Send this Article to a Friend

A juvenile exercise from a craftsman

Dil Toh Baccha Hai Ji (Hindi)

Cast: Ajay Devgn, Shahzahn Padamsee, Shraddha Das, Emraan Hashmi, Tisca Chopra

Director: Madhur Bhandarkar

Known to look at the world through the lens of a voyeur, Madhur Bhandarkar continues to play with the stereotypical middleclass outlook. In this tale of three men caught in a web of love, he has acquired a comic tone but with his stamp of in-your-face realism. To his credit, Bhandarkar has aspired to carve a harsher take on the matters of heart, not as simplistic as an average Bollywood candyfloss. But it is not as satisfying as a typical Bhandarkar film.

In an attempt to reach out to a larger audience, he has joined with Sanjay Chhel for dialogues, best known for his work with Govinda and David Dhawan. In this obtuse company, the film falls between two stools, sorry, schools of filmmaking. The screenplay is somewhat salvaged by some credible performances by Ajay Devgn, Omi Vaidya and Tisca Chopra. The bonding between the male protagonists is spot on.

After a hackneyed start, the track between Naren and his bubbly intern (Shahzahn Padamsee) hooks you into the male bastion, where Naren and his two paying guests are in various stages of figuring out love. Devgn is a revelation as a banker going through the midlife crises. In a role which reminds of Amol Palekar and Sanjeev Kumar, he has imbibed the self-consciousness of going out with a girl who was three when he lost his innocence.

The way he sings “Koi Hota Jisko Apna” in a discotheque rings a bell.

Omi Vaidya as the pure heart looking for true love endears. When he is used by an ambitious wannabe actor (Shraddha Das who disappoints), it has a tinge of realityThe bit about the Casanova gym trainer Abby (Emraan Hashmi), who renders his services to a much-married ex-Miss India (Tisca Chopra) before he falls for her stepdaughter (Shruti Haasan) was worth exploring but it frittered away.

Tisca looks too dignified to indulge in toy boys. Bad, for Bhandarkar is known for his well fleshed out female characters.

Also, this time Madhur's trademark side characters, a distinctive feature of his cinema; don't add any freshness to the film except for the scene where a waiter (Manoj Joshi) offers an unsolicited ‘Bollywoodish' advice to Omi when his love walks out on him.

In the end it turns out to be a mildly entertaining film that sporadically brings smiles if you keep your expectations in check.

ANUJ KUMAR

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail



Karnataka

News: ePaper | Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous | Engagements |
Advts:
Retail Plus | Classifieds | Jobs | Obituary | Updates: Breaking News |


News Update



The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | The Hindu ePaper | Business Line | Business Line ePaper | Sportstar | Frontline | Publications | eBooks | Images | Ergo | Home |

Copyright 2011, The Hindu. Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu