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Indian dyeing units striving to go green

M.K. Ananth



Namakkal: More than two decades after he invented a novel Airflow Technology to dye fabrics, the founder of Germany-based DyeTech UG, Carl Cordes, feels that awareness has now started increasing among Indian dyeing units to preserve the environment.

Dr. Carl, who was here on Monday as part of his week-long tour across the country wherein he has been meeting dyeing unit holders, told The Hindu that his invention that dates back to 1990 required an average 25 to 30 litres of water to dye a kilogram of fabric against the nearly 85 litres required by Softflow/ Overflow technology used at present.

Cost-effective

He said that the technology works on the principle of aerodynamic dyeing system where the dye stuff penetrates through the fabric at high pressure ensuring high quality dyeing with minimal use of water.

In layman's language it is a small-size aeroplane blower, he said. This cutting edge AirFlow technology is priced about 15 per cent higher than the Softflow technology but the returns in terms of cost cutting could be realised at ease, he added.

Response

Dr. Carl stated that in the recent years there had been overwhelming response for his technology in the Indian market – mostly in Tamil Nadu.

“The response is due to the advantages of the technology compared to earlier methods," he said

Potential

Dr. Carl felt that China and India were better grounds for textile machinery and fabrics due to their enormous local consumer base in addition to their vast export potential.

The per capita annual fabric consumption in the United States was 40 kg and it was 20 kg in Europe, much higher than in India and China but the multitude of population in the latter two countries had made them textile destinations, he added.

A unit at Kasipalayam in Tirupur was the first in India to install the technology in 2005.

Since then 15 more units in the State had installed the system while 21 more were in the pipeline.

With the government tightening its noose at other textile hubs in the country (Ludhiana) there was high potential for eco-friendly fabric dyeing machinery in India, he added.

RO plants

Commenting on the opposition from local people who sought ban on dumping Reverse Osmosis plant and biologically-treated dyeing water into rivers, Dr. Carl felt that properly treated water was much better than the river water itself.

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