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Even the actors seem clueless about the muddled plot



Nothing new:The film has an interesting enough premise, but it is treated with very little originality.

I Am Number Four (English)

Cast: Alex Pettyfer, Dianna Agron, Timothy Olyphant, Teresa Palmer

Director: D.J. Caruso

Another teen science fiction film adapted from a popular book is here, but it works like the number two version of Twilight.

Nine survivors from a distant planet are hiding on Earth. They are on the run from the villainous extra-terrestrials called Mogadorians who destroyed their planet and are now after them. Three have been eliminated and now its time for our hero, John Smith, who happens to be Number Four (Alex Pettyfer is suitably good-looking logwood, who seems to think non-acting can pass off as brooding) to stand up and take charge.

He is a reluctant hero, leading a low-profile life with his guardian, Henri (Timothy Olyphant keeps it over the top). He doesn't want to get into the mess because he doesn't relate to its origin (not his fault, even we can't!).

But when the villains become a threat to his love, Sarah (Dianna Agron is the saving grace), he is left with no option, and we get the standard bang-bang routine. It is an interesting enough premise to keep undemanding teenagers engaged with a handkerchief, but unfortunately it is treated like a bloated television show with very little originality.

The darkness, the melancholy all seem so plastic. The villains are cut from Mogambo's cardboard with little conviction.

When you give unlimited power to your protagonist, the risk factor that draws you to the edge hardly comes into play. And when it finally does, director D.J. Caruso introduces Number Six (Teresa Palmer), who steals the thunder from the supposed centre of attraction.

Yes, the action scenes are better choreographed than emotions, but that's not saying much.

The actors seem clueless about the muddled plot for a large part of the film.

The chemistry between the unusual lovers is not properly explored and pedestrian dialogues make it improbable.

ANUJ KUMAR

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