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“Diabetes affects search for prospective partners in youth”

Bindu Shajan Perappadan


“India has 35 million diabetics, but little has been done to tackle social fallout of the disease”

There is fear that diabetes-affected persons cannot have normal and healthy children


NEW DELHI: Diabetic youngsters often find it difficult to find non-diabetic partners. This, in many cases, leads to depression and frustration, which in turn might lead to suicidal tendencies. This was found in a survey conducted among the Capital's young diabetics by the Delhi Diabetes Research Centre (DDRC), a non-government organisation.

“India has 35 million diabetics and is referred to as the diabetes Capital of the world, but still little has been done to tackle the social fallout of the disease. The stigma associated with diabetes is affecting the youth in finding prospective life partners,” says DDRC chairperson A. K. Jhingan.

According to him, the increasing incidence of type-I diabetes is leading to a variety of social problems, including difficulty in finding partners and continuation of marriage. “Of such patients, less than 10 per cent are happily married, while an astounding 90 per cent plus face matrimonial problems,” notes the survey.

“These issues have surfaced repeatedly from testimonials posted on our website [diabeticmatrimony.com], which gave us the first insight into the problem,'' says Dr. Jhingan.

According to the survey on marriage-related problems among diabetics — carried out among 2,000 people in age group of 19 to 31 years — it was revealed that finding a suitable life partner was among the most common concerns for a diabetic.

“Confrontation, separation and divorce were common among them.” “Of the type-I diabetic married women, nearly 50 per cent were sent back to their parental home within a year of marriage. Nearly 25 per cent lost interest in taking care of themselves due to lack of financial assistance from their husbands,” reports the study.

There is fear that diabetes-affected persons cannot have normal and healthy children. In fact, more often than not, diabetic men chose to remain silent about their disease before entering matrimony.

“The website helps people suffering from type-1 and type-2 diabetes find suitable matches. More than 500 people have registered themselves with the website. And of late, there have been many success stories,'' says Dr. Jhingan.

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