Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Friday, Mar 25, 2011
ePaper | Mobile/PDA Version
Google



Karnataka

News: ePaper | Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous | Engagements |
Advts:
Retail Plus | Classifieds | Jobs | Obituary |

Karnataka Printer Friendly Page   Send this Article to a Friend

Trade brought down feudalism: Surendra Rao

Staff Correspondent


‘Trade, which began as explorative exercise, later became expansionist'

Gradually, the expansionist trade became exploitative: professor


Shirva (Udupi District): B. Surendra Rao, former professor, Department of History, Mangalore University, said on Thursday it was trade which brought down feudalism and gave rise to capitalism.

He was delivering the keynote address on “Trade as a transformative agency” at the inaugural function of the two-day national-level conference on “Karnataka's overseas contacts and trade through ages” organised by the Mulki Sunder Ram Shetty (MSRS) College here.

Prof. Rao said that trade and commerce played a vital role in the growth of a nation. Trade, which began as explorative exercise, later became expansionist. But expansionist trade also faced challenges in the form of piracy. Gradually, the expansionist trade became exploitative as traders began establishing colonies. Europeans hardly knew about spices. But once spices were taken to Europe, a demand was created. Spices in India were then being collected in the wild. It was only after there was more demand that cultivation of spices began here. After becoming a British colony, India had to supply raw material to meet the needs of England, where industrial revolution was on. Trade also gave birth to certain castes which became well versed in it. Some members of the Bunt community in the undivided Dakshina Kannada, who were primarily into agriculture, took to trade and prospered in it.

He said that trade also give a fillip to the process of urbanisation. There was State intervention, once trade became successful. The Government began levying taxes on it, and thus, generating revenues. It was now being said that States might become irrelevant owing to the global movement of capital.

College principal Y. Bhaskar Shetty welcomed.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail



Karnataka

News: ePaper | Front Page | National | Tamil Nadu | Andhra Pradesh | Karnataka | Kerala | New Delhi | Other States | International | Opinion | Business | Sport | Miscellaneous | Engagements |
Advts:
Retail Plus | Classifieds | Jobs | Obituary | Updates: Breaking News |


News Update



The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | The Hindu ePaper | Business Line | Business Line ePaper | Sportstar | Frontline | Publications | eBooks | Images | Ergo | Home |

Copyright 2011, The Hindu. Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu