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Monday, Nov 20, 2006
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Education Plus Visakhapatnam
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Creativity takes a backseat

Tutorials and coaching centres that once had started as peripheral institutes now pose a threat of defeating the very purpose of education. These centres are doing more harm than good by imposing a regimen system that is turning students into Xerox machines. The emphasis is only to make students mug up and reproduce. The net result is majority of students who feel stifled in this system are just robbed of their creativity.

The sole reason why students are inclined towards these institutions is to avoid the problem of going to different places for tuition in different subjects and parents who can't see beyond MBBS and Engineering queuing up before these colleges. They have already eliminated the faculty of Arts, games and sports are brushed aside and programs like NCC have been made extinct. The government also seems to agree that the society can survive with just doctors and engineers.

T. Sreenivasa Prabhu,
Ongole

Motivation needed

I totally agree with the article that exposed the truth of the corporate colleges. As Vivekananda said, "Development should be both mental and physical." But corporate colleges don't have faith in that. Students are not exposed to other co-curricular activities. Colleges work on Sundays too and this has led to students losing interest in studies. Motivating the students is also necessary, which is not done in most of corporate colleges. Students are made not to think beyond Engineering & Medical entrance tests. Why don't the parents ask these colleges the success percentage? With over 40,000 students in each of the Corporate group not even 1000 get seat-getting ranks. What about the rest?

Balaji

`Mere products'

These institutions treat students as products, rather than as human beings and the colleges resemble concrete jungles. There is little chance for creativity. Creative thinking is the only way to success and to achieve greater heights in life. Students don't get a chance to prepare their own notes by going through various textbooks but are made to mug up the prepared notes. When a student prepares notes on his own, he can attempt any type of questions in the examination. Besides, these colleges don't give importance to co-curricular activities and extra curricular activities. Hence, overall personality development is not possible.

The system also weakens the bond between the parents and children. Loneliness, competitive pressure and distress are leading to suicidal attempts. In a nutshell they live the life of prisoners surrounded by huge walls and jailors. Corporate colleges must change their commercial attitude and impart creative thinking in the minds of the students. I also request the parents not to force their children to take science groups only. Let them opt for their choice of subjects to excel in their career.

V. Srinivas,
Lecturer

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