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Providing a platform


CLASSICAL ARTS need right patronage and platforms to flourish. In today's strobe-lit world of fast dance and music, these are hard to come by. But there are a number of youngsters taking to classical dance and music and shaping up well to bear the mantle of India's great tradition. Bhubaneswar-based Sanskruti O Sanskruti has come up with a much-needed shot in the arm for such arts and artists.

The first chapter of its bi-monthly `asara' providing a forum to classical, music, vocal and instrumental, and classical dance was held recently. In keeping with its avowed objective of featuring veterans and young talents, the maiden concert had a young Odissi dancer Gitanjali Acharya presenting a recital along with seasoned artistes like Ramesh Chandra Das on the violin, Karunakar Nayak in Hindustani vocal and Bijay Kumar Jena in Odissi vocal.

Nayak opened with a `Raag Bhopali' and ended his performance with a `bhajan'. Bijay's was a bravura performance. Blessed with a voice of good timbre he sang `Aha Mo Lavanyanidhi Harai basili buddhi' in `raag Gurjari' set to `ektal'. His second song, the popular `Mana sumana', was composed in `raag Khamaj' and set to `Rupak taal'.

A bit longer-than-required `alaap' in the opening made the audience a little fidgety; otherwise, it was a rivetting show. Ramesh Das chose `raag Durga' in `teen taal'. He was in superb nick with Pandit Umesh Chandra Kar giving him tabla support. Das ended with a `Dhun' in `Mishra Pilu'.

The concluding item was Gitanjali's Odissi. First `Durga stuti' and then `Kirwani pallavi' both choreographed by the late legendary Guru Kelucharan Mohapatra showcased her obvious promise. A student of Sujata Mohapatra, the noted dancer and daughter-in-law of Guru Kelucharan, Gitanjali showed the impress of her teacher in the languid body movements and neatness of `mudras'. Requiring a bit more of stamina, she is definitely an exciting Odissi prospect for the future.

The classical concert was inaugurated by noted singer Arati Mishra lighting the lamp and mercifully there was no speech delaying the cultural programmes.

B.M.

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