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Pristine purity of Nangiarkoothu

Usha Nangiar's recital demonstrated her histrionic skills.



Usha Nangiar effortlessly depicted the Navarasas.

THE NANGIARKOOTHU performance of Usha Nangiar was captivating because of its pristine purity. This dancer needs little introduction to Koodiyattam and Nangiarkoothu aficionados the world over. She is the prima ballerina of her art form. Usha underscored this through her recent performance at `Nalukettu' in Cherpu, Thrissur.

The programme was arranged like a chamber recital in a very traditional atmosphere.

For the evening Usha Nangiar chose to perform the story `Kamsa vadham' (the slaying of Kamsa), which is one of the rare pieces of Nangiarkoothu that gives scope to the artiste to depict the Navarasas and bhakti bhava apart from the Pakarnattam (the actor or actress enacting different characters).

Captivating performance

Through her captivating performance and excellent depiction of rasas such as Atbudha, Roudra, Vipralamba Sringara, Hasya, Veera, Karuna, Bahaya, Beebhatsa, Santha and Bhakti. Usha Nangiar's 75-minute recital enthralled the audience. She was accompanied on the Mizhavu by her husband, Kalamandalam Hariharan, and a team of his talented disciples, Shankar, Kishore and Sreejith. Kalamandalam Kesavankutty was on the edakka and Sreedevi, Usha's disciple, provided the thalam. Watching a brilliant performance of a traditional art form like the Nangiarkoothu in such an ambience is always a rare experience.

"On one side we all promote our arts, but on the other side, the atmosphere at most theatres are instances of disrespect towards the art forms as well the artistes," says Prem Manasvi, a German living in Kerala for over a decade, who arranged the show.

"After the show the Indian audience leaves in a hurry without sharing their experience and interacting with each other," adds Manasvi who had also arranged an interaction with the artistes after the show.

K.K. GOPALAKRISHNAN

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