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A classical salute to music

Good renditions marked the `Bhakti Sangeetham'.



Dwaram Lakshmi.

The Department of Culture, Government of Andhra Pradesh, organised a programme of music, titled`Bhakti Sangeetham' at Ravindra Bharati recently. Though it was devotional music, the choice of the artistes was so good that it added certain amount of classicism.

Dwaram Lakshmi, granddaughter of late violin maestro Dwaram Venkataswami Naidu, opened the concert that evening. She belongs to the Vizianagaram School and learned from her father Dwaram Bhavanarayana Rao, and M.L. Vasantha Kumari. Being a Hindustani vocalist too, her rendition of devotionals gained vocal appeal. Lakshmi sang devotional songs from several languages. Annamayya's Podagantimayya in Mohana, Kurai Ondrum, and a Tamil devotional of Rajaji, Krishna Nee Begane in Yamuna Kalyani, of Purandara Dasa and a Tarangam of Narayana Theertha marked her programme. Charanamule Nammiti in Kapi of Bhakta Ramadasu was the highlight. A. Jairam on violin and Parupalli Bala Subrahmanyam on mridangam, both from Tirupati, lent good support.

A feature titled Ramadasu Atmanivedanam, which was designed by A.S. Murthy for Bhakta Ramadasu Project, followed this. Ace singer K.B.K. Mohanraju rendered a selection of Ramadasu compositions each preceded by a small epilogue on the particular composition with reference to Ramadasu's life, for almost all the lyrics he wrote were the output of his own experiences. Tarakamantramu in Dhanyasi, Ye Teeruga Nanu in Nadanamakriya, and Adigo Bhadradri in Varali, Anta Ramamayam in Mohana, were some of the songs rendered on the occasion.

Vedavathi enthralls

Vedathavathi Prabhakar is one of the finest singers of devotional both with classical and light classical flavour. The veteran musician opened the concert with a sloka as a prelude to the rendition of Annamacharya's Idigaaka Soubhagya, which she herself set in Misr Bahudhari. Then came Purandara Dasar's devaranamam, Narayana Ninna Namada Smarane in Suddha Dhanyasi and Tulasidas bhajan, Jaya Jayavanta in Hamsadhwani with Hindustani flavor.



Vedavathi Prabhakar.

She then rendered Radhika Krishna which she tuned in Bhageswari. Annamacharya's Bhavayami Gopalabalam in Yamuna Kalyani was another pleasing rendition, besides a folk melody, also of Annamacharya — Yenda Gaani, Vana Gaani. Paluku Tenela Talli in Abheri and a Meerabai bhajan translated into Telugu by Narayana Reddy, Adenu Meera set in Sindhu Bhairavi, were the other compositions she presented.

The last show was that of Garimella Balakrishna Prasad, disciple of Nedunuri Krishna Murthy and first singer of TTD's Annamacharya Project. However, he added a few more songs of the others on this occasion especially that of noted poet Samavedam Shanmukha Sarma.

Accompanied by Dinakar on violin, M.L.N. Raju on mridangam and Ghantasala Satyasayi on morsing, he reeled out a few popular and rarely heard songs.

G.S.

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