Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Friday, Jun 23, 2006
Google



Friday Review Thiruvananthapuram
Published on Fridays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Friday Review | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Friday Review    Bangalore    Chennai and Tamil Nadu    Delhi    Hyderabad    Thiruvananthapuram   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Wide range of films

Classic and contemporary films will be screened at the Sixth Filca International Film Festival.



MOVIE MAGIC: Scenes from `Achenurangathu Veedu,'

Classics along with movies made this millennium will be screened at the week-long Sixth Filca International Film Festival (June 23 to 29). Films from the Malayalam New Wave and the Pasolini Retrospective are the highlights of the festival.

`Saira,' the inaugural film directed by self-taught filmmaker Biju, dwells on a contemporary theme, the aftermath of communal violence on a family. A true feel of contemporary Indian cinema is brought to the cineaste with Aparna Sen's `15 Park Avenue,' Nagesh Kukkunnoor's `Iqbal,' Mahesh Manjrekar's `Page 3' and Jahar Kanungo's `Nishshabd.' While the first three films have earned plaudits, it is Kanungo's maiden film, an award-winner at the Osian's Cinefan Asian Film Festival, which handles a unique subject, `noise and noiselessness,' and promises a fresh approach to an untouched theme.

Notes of a flautist

The three films `Atithi,' `Swayamvaram' and `Pokkuveyil' have a special place in the history of Malayalam cinema. `Atithi' by K.P. Kumaran and `Swayamvaram' by Adoor Gopalakrishnan introduced the viewer to a hitherto unknown technique of using film as more than just a mere story-telling device. G. Aravindan relies on the notes of flautist Hariprasad Chaurasia to provide the base for the taut film `Pokkuveyil.' The Tribute section screens Adoor's `Anantharam,' which is known for novelty of theme and the narrative style adopted.



From `Saira.'

Pier Paolo Pasolini's films were never relished by the establishment in Italy. A one time Roman Catholic who later became a Marxist, his films `Decameron,' `The Canterbury Tales' and `Arabian Nights' were based on `medieval tales and celebrated the world of simple joys and sexuality.'

Interestingly Pasolini has his explanation for choosing his cast for his films.

Casting his own mother as Virgin Mary in `The Gospel according to St Mathew' and Terence Stamp as the bisexual in `Theorem' he explained thus, "I chose actors because of what they are as human beings, not because of what they can do."

Figuring among the 34 films to be screened at this festival are `Pirosmani,' `Cold Mountain,' `The Colour of Lies,' `Harakiri,' `Capote' and the Roger Vadim film `And... God Created Woman.' The prize-winning campus videos at `Filca's Campus Filmfest' held early this year will also be screened. This has become a regular feature at all the annual events of this fledgling film society.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail



Friday Review    Bangalore    Chennai and Tamil Nadu    Delhi    Hyderabad    Thiruvananthapuram   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Friday Review | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | Sportstar | Frontline | Publications | eBooks | Images | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2006, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu