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Contrasting moods

LALITHAA KRISHNAN

There was great variety as K. Bhaskaran played.

Photo:S.R.Raghunathan

REPOSEFUL: K. Bhaskaran.

A spirit of repose enveloped listeners present at K. Bhaskaran's flute recital for Nadopasana recently. Pallavi Gopala Iyer's Kalyani Ata tala varnam, `Vanajakshi,' a favourite with vocalists and instrumentalists alike, was the ideal launch pad, etching a picture of strength and grace, with its lovely glides and distinguished turn of phrase.

A succession of kritis ushered in a series of contrasting moods. Muthuswami Dikshitar's `Vallabha nayakasya' (Begada) at a slightly accelerated pace initiated a fruitful kalpanaswara dialogue between flute and violin. The artiste's approach to Muthuswami Dikshitar's `Sri Bhargavi' (Mangalakaisiki) was contemplative, while Abhogi radiated charm in the rendition of Tyagaraja's `Manasunilpa.'

Not heard as a detailed exposition in quite a while, the Shanmukhapriya alapana held much appeal. It was not a regimented essay, but rather, a progression of impressions forming a collage of now bright, now muted images.

Adventurous forays

In Patnam Subramania Iyer's `Marivere,' there were adventurous forays and a random natural patterning of swaras that engaged the listener with their fluency. The main raga, Sankarabharanam was characterised by deep sweeping jarus, resonant karvais and ripe phrases that fanned out to establish an air of visranthi. The niraval-swara segment in Tyagaraja's `Edhutanilichite' stood out for catchy sets of permutations.

V.L.Kumar on the violin presented a Sankarabharanam that strove to reflect the main artiste's ideas. Restraint was the key to the success of the percussive accompaniment of Papanasam Kumar on the mridangam and Guruprasad on the ghatam, the tani avartanam evolving as a welcome non-aggressive exchange.

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