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For you, about you! -- Evano Oruvan

Few and far between they may be, but it is films such as ‘Evano Oruvan’ (U) that make film lovers optimistic about the future of Tamil cinema. Rising against wrongs and striving to right them is typical of any hero. But in showcasing the mindset of a middleclass citizen who generally gets lost in the sea of faces we see everyday, this Leukos Films and Abbas Mustan presentation is indeed different. Sridhar Vasudevan, the protagonist in ‘Evano …’ is a plausible ‘Gentleman,’ a true-to-life ‘Anniyan.’ Yet very ingeniously story-screenplay writer and director Nishikant Kamath keeps the man as ordinary as any of us till the end and still makes a hero out of him — a hero devoid of ostentation, affectation and bravado! In attire, demeanour and attitude, Madhavan skilfully projects the turbulence of Vasudevan, torn between the values imbibed and gruesome reality. You cannot but empathise with Madhavan’s authentic portrayal.

Noteworthy show

Sridhar Vasudevan (Madhavan), a straightforward bank employee, who struggles to make ends meet, is suddenly unable to control himself when he is time and again assaulted by hypocrisy, corruption and malpractice. Unwittingly, he turns into a one-man army. On a punitive spree, he begins beating up the wrongdoer with a bat and soon graduates to the knife and gun. But he is no murderer. From this point (just about 15 minutes from the opening of the film) ‘Evano Oruvan’ gains the pace of a veritable thriller.

Absolutely in sync with the character of Vatsala, Vasudevan’s wife, Sangeetha puts up an admirable show. So genuine, so natural! Conscientious yet corrupt, police officer Seeman presents a new dimension to the role. You can’t forget the artist, Vinith, who keeps drawing images on the roadside, either. The eyes haunt you. Among the minor characters, the old couple at the hospital (Desikan and Subhadra) stands apart. Matching the dialogue (written by Madhavan under the supervision of Seeman) in intensity and poignancy is Sanjay Jadhav’s camera. The top angles during Madhavan’s soliloquy, for instance. The dialogue, however, gets too lengthy here. Nagu’s unobtrusive artwork is another commendable aspect. Re-recording with its telling silences vouch for Sameer’s composing skills. The superlative quality of the editing (Amit Pawar) is a significant reason for the speed at which the tale travels.

‘Evano …’ is as much a crest on Madhavan’s cap as it is on Nishikant’s — one they can always be proud of.

Evano Oruvan

Genre: Drama

Director: Nishikant

Cast: Madhavan, Sangeetha, Seeman

Storyline: When an ordinary citizen is up in arms against the unscrupulous mighty …

Bottomline: If Tamil cinema has to move forward, we better encourage films like ‘Evano Oruvan’

MALATHI RANGARAJAN

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