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The seven-day itch

SERISH NANISETTI

Play The one-act Marathi play was a rib-tickler.



Play time Suresh, Trupti, Rupesh, Prajakta and Nishant

The folks had come expecting to see a play where the characters talk in their mothertongue, have some gupshup in Marathi with the other theatre goers and if the play could make them laugh well then that was a bonus.

On Sunday afternoon at the Telugu University Auditorium, Anil Ekbote's play Vaat Pahato Premachi ( Waiting for Love) directed by Sunil Chandurkar was staged by Udaan.

On a near bare stage with a ‘diwan', one table, two doorways and calendar marked with big crosses, the protagonist Dilip (Rupesh Kalantari) sits glumly when a bespectacled lady called Mrudula Bai (Trupti Agashe) in sari walks in as if she is wearing jackboots, unspools a paper and reads out terms and conditions. Apparently, she is the house owner and the tenants have to agree to a condition that no guest should stay with them for more than seven days. The guest whose seven days are numbered happens to be Ganesh (Nishant Gharipurikar), the brother-in-law of the protagonist. He is waiting for his girlfriend Nandini who wants to meet him only at his sister's place. “How can I ask my brother to leave the house?” asks the sister Rucha (Prajakta Phasalkar). The husband agrees. But in walks Mr A. Subbarao (Suresh Kumar), the nosy parker neighbour, who lets the cat out of the bag. Instead of getting intimidated or scared, Ganesh decides to teach the landlady a lesson. Subbarao is thrilled to bits that the landlady is going to be taught a lesson, he runs back to his wife to tell her that. But Ganesh doesn't get a word from his girlfriend and swings between despair and hope. A classical Marathi number and the song and dance from Gammat Jammat: ye na priye, ye na priye… to the delight of the audience.

Perhaps it was the size of the auditorium that the play appeared to be too loud and boisterous. The action over the top. But nobody was complaining as the audience came out laughing and talking in Marathi.

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