Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Sunday, Jun 20, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Life
Published on All days

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Life    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Thiruvananthapuram   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Unlocking your `silent' voice

WHEN JULIE Andrews said she would not sing again professionally after a badly done throat operation, an entire generation which grew up on Mary Poppins and The Sound of Music was disappointed.

The singer-actor's troubles made headlines around the world, but a voice trainer here believes there are many more singers who suffer from untreated and unrecognised voice problems.

The voice trainer, Ananth Vaidyanathan, is no stranger to Bangalore. He was here in February to conduct a workshop on voice training and he plans to organise another from June 20 to 22. Mr. Vaidyanathan, who headed the Indian Classical Music Division of HMV, was himself a `victim' of wrong vocal techniques. Already trained in Classical music, he developed voice problems while training in Hindustani music. He was advised to sing softly and he lost even his "speaking voice." Mr. Vaidyanathan was in his early 20s then.

In 1983, Pandit Sunil Bose of the ITC Sangeet Academy taught him a technique that brought back his voice immediately. "The instant result was a revelation to me — that the voice works in ways we do not normally understand." He thought he had no voice. But by just pushing the muscles in a certain way, he was able to have full voice, Mr. Vaidyanathan writes on the carnatica.net website.

But he was not satisfied with his voice and he tried to understand how a singing voice actually worked. A Ford Foundation grant in 1990 led him around Europe, and he found Professor Peter Calatin and his teacher, Professor Fredirick Bruckner Ruggerberg, two Germans settled in Ireland. They had spent their lives finding the right voice techniques and finally discovered them in late Professor Fredirick Husler. After learning from them, Mr. Vaidyanathan was soon singing again after a 12-year gap.

That was how he started understanding voice culture techniques as expounded by Husler. "Using Husler's works I have been able to cure many voices of problems and insufficiencies. I have been able to bring back voices declared dead by experts in London," he says on the site.

The Mumbai-based singer-researcher will be in Bangalore between June 20 and 22 during the workshop, which is for actors, musicians, and teachers. The event will be held at the Arora Business Centre, Dickenson Road. More information is available on phone. Details of Mr. Vaidyanathan's voice training techniques are on the Internet (www.carnatica.net) .

By Divya Sreedharan

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Life    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Thiruvananthapuram   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2004, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu