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Sting along!

Sting has matured as a songwriter, as his latest album proves...


His band was earlier called `Sting' and `Police'. Later he went solo, and his last album, `Brand New Day', swept the Grammy awards in 1999. The Desert Rose guy, Sting, is back with his new album, `Sacred Love'. Each song in this album projects an abstract idea.

The inspiration for `Sacred Love' (Universal Music; Cassette: Rs. 135) came to Sting during a concert organised in Italy two years ago. "People had come from all over the world to see me, and I felt they needed some kind of therapy, just to be together," he says in his website (www.sting.com) . This concert set him thinking, and he felt the need to mature as a songwriter, and consequently, Sacred Love projects a philosophical basis of love. The songs look at love as an emotion, and project ideas that relate to the human spirit. "There is something happening in the human spirit," says Sting, "and we are all connected to it, whether you are American, or British, or from the Islamic world. We are connected to some energy in the world, and we need to sort out what it is," he adds.

The first single, Send Your Love, talks about attaining human salvation. There is no religion but sound and dancing, sings Sting. The song projects his personal view -- he feels that music, sound and dancing is religion to him.

Forget About the Future satirically suggests how people dig up the wounds from the past, and fail to move ahead. This War, which, according to Sting, was written during the build-up of the Iraq war, reflects on the meaninglessness of wars. Beginning to feel that the album is too serious and abstract for you? Well, not really. The lyrics do make you think, but Sting's vocals and music are infectious, especially Send Your Love, which has already made it to the billboard charts.

The remix version of this track is sure to be a hit with DJs. Inside is hard-hitting.

Being the first track in the album, it seems to set the mood and energy for the rest of the album. Whenever I Say Your Name features Mary J. Blige.

If you are the `thinking' type, this album is ideal for you. If you just want to listen to some good music, buy the album for Send Your Love.

A. VISHNU

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