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Fall in love now... Kal Ho Naa Ho



Scene from "Kal Ho Naa Ho", now showing at cinema halls across Delhi.

KAL HO NAA HO

(At Odeon and other Delhi theatres)

IT IS time to fall in love. Fall in love with Preity Zinta, she of dimpled smiles, blessed with a face that embraces life, eyes that reflect it, and a voice that reverberates with it.

Time to fall in love. Fall in love with Saif Ali Khan, that earnest guy who almost always loses so that somebody else may win. The guy who has an endearing, winsome quality and an indefinable charm of his own which makes even losers look attractive.

It is time to fall in love with Shah Rukh Khan, doing his "Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge", "Kuch Kuch Hota Hai" act again. And again emerging a winner. Time to fall in love with the guy who does the same thing over and over again but does it with such panache that all you can do is sit back and wait for that master artiste to unfold his magic again. His enthusiasm unbounded, his energy unbridled, Shah Rukh is in form here. And as a guy with a few days to live and a life to spend in a moment, he looks for your sympathy. He reduces many to tears. And with each tear he rises a rank higher in the echelons of actors.

It is time to fall in love with Yash Johar's craft. Be it "Kuch Kuch Hota Hai", "Kabhi Khushi Kabhie Gham" or "Kal Ho Naa Ho", be it Karan Johar, or Nikhil Advani who masquerades as a director here, the man gives us films with a feeling. There is hope, there is dejection, and there is delight in them. Above all, there is a sense of life.

Yes, that's the word. It is time to fall in love with life, one moment it makes you want to walk out, next moment it embraces you. And you just thank your stars that you did not throw in the towel when all seemed lost, that you cared to wait because every dusk has to have a dawn.

That's true of this film too. At times you feel like walking out - it is too lengthy, the humour too reminiscent of the earlier ventures to have a touch of freshness to it. Shah Rukh's part is on predictable lines. So is Saif's. And just when you feel that the editor's scissors had been left in the monsoon too long, there is a surprise. The three actors take charge of the proceedings, and all the meandering pace gives way to a sharply focussed film. Bland humour gives way to an undercurrent of sentiments that tug at your heart, warm your day, your eyes brim over. That's when this routine love triangle gives you shades of "Anand". That is when the film kicks away all aberrations, and the director delivers with a punch. He is aided of course by fine cinematography, reasonable music and three charmers for performers.

Watch "Kal Ho Naa Ho". It is like life. It gives you reason to be disappointed, just as it gives you reason to hope.

JANASHEEN

(At Delite and other theatres)

SHE POUTS her lips, reveals her cleavage, exposes her ample midriff, bangs her thighs. She gives it `all' but to no avail - never was a logwood imbued with qualities of ardour. And seldom was a girl with lesser talent seen on the big screen. She is just about tolerable when she keeps quiet, she blurs the boundary when she decides to speak. Truly, Celina Jaitly is the albatross director Feroz Khan has to carry through the film, "Janasheen".



Scene from "Janasheen", now showing at cinema halls across Delhi.

As a girl with partial visual impairment, she seeks our sympathy but wears clothes aimed at getting out all the closet emotions. Despite prancing around in the skimpiest of clothes in the role of an orphan pining for her love, she is not a shade on Zeenat Aman of "Satyam Shivam Sundaram" or Urmila Matondkar of "Rangeela".

Much like the film itself that is far removed from the days of "Qurbani" and "Jaanbaaz" for Feroz Khan. The debonair actor-director on his part is back in his inimitable style, the same swashbuckling ways, and the same swagger. In the well etched out role of billionaire businessman Saba Karim he seeks to carry the film on his shoulders. And does succeed to some extent. However, in doing so, and concentrating on Jaitly's well-exhibited charms, he forgets son, Fardeen, cast here as the estranged son of another businessman, this time back home in India. The lad is in Australia, into speed biking and all that. He loves girls, including of course, Jaitly, distrusts his dad, has faith in Karim. That is till the final denouement. By then dad dear would have passed away, the girls - Kashmira Shah and Pinky Hirwani give competition to Jaitly - failed to sustain enthusiasm. And all the shots of prolonged race come to naught. Then there are basic details - never the strong point for Feroz - that are missing. The girl plays a violin in a sea, the billionaire offers namaz the way nobody does or can, the lovers meet after a time gap of a dozen years and still recognise each other instantly! Clearly, this is a film that won't be too close to Feroz's heart when he sits down to write his biography.

ZIYA US SALAM

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