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Rakta Kanneeru (Telugu)
Cast: Upendra, Ramyakrishna, Abhirami
Music & direction: Sadhu Kokila

AS A stage play, Rakta Kanneeru was made popular by the late character actor Nagabhushanam. This present film too is evolved on the same lines. So was M. Radha's play with the same title in Tamil, which was the forerunner to all these productions. The beauty of the script is its adaptability to hurl caustic remarks on any political and social situations and developments, extempore. Some of the remarks the hero passes on the moral conditions in society are well received in the auditorium. Unfortunately, the film's narrative scope is limited only to the suffering of the hero from leprosy, the result of his ugly romantic adventures.

The film starts with the arrival of Mohan (Upendra) in India after a long foreign sojourn. He is bent upon enjoying life, with women and wine. He gets both at the house of a prostitute, Kantha (Ramyakrishna). He spends all his money on these two evils. He even belittles his mother and wife. His wife Chandra (Abhirami), friend Balu (Kumar Bangarappa) and his mother are the concerned lot. Kantha, who is also said to be a film star, is bent upon looting his wealth and destroying him mentally and physically.

A doctor declares that Mohan is suffering from leprosy. Kantha throws him out and he lands up at the house where his wife lives. Kantha dies in a plane accident. A reformed Mohan requests that after his death, a statue be made as a reminder to all the men of the consequence of all vices.

Upendra's performance is very good, he lives the role. Unfortunately, the dubbing voice and the accent used for him sound artificial. Ramyakrishna too matched her performance with his style as an egoistic, ambitious and selfish woman. Kumar as Mohan's friend Balu leaves his mark. Abhirami gets the role that needs to project the agony of a wife. She is shown weeping always. Music score by the director himself is palatable.

GUDIPOODI SRIHARI

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