Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Monday, Mar 15, 2004

About Us
Contact Us
Metro Plus
Published on Mondays & Thursdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Seven ways to beat stress

The answer lies is keeping fit



K.C. Jose helps young professionals cope with killing work schedules.

WORK-RELATED stress is a complaint we often hear from professionals. While many work around stress by taking time off to go to pubs or parties, there are others who try and keep fit. Being physically fit means being mentally fit, and that, in turn, means productive work too. Fitness Force, run by K.C. Jose, a physical fitness and yoga trainer, works on the latter principle.

Fitness Force focuses on de-stressing individuals through counselling and physical fitness sessions spread over a month. Jose, who has been an athlete and has trained many for body-building and weightlifting championships at the University and State levels, says he has come across problems among a lot of professionals who work 12 to 16 hours a day on an average, particularly in IT-related industries. "Most of them complain of strain on the neck, back, and even joints. That happens when there is very little physical activity and the nature of corporate work allows very little time for it. When I saw many youngsters struggling, I decided I could use my experience in physical fitness to work out a stress-relieving course for young professionals," says Jose. The course, however, is open to middle-aged people too.

The course entails seven programmes spread over a month for an hour every other day: stress-level auditing, Chi-power assessment, yoga-triggs (for performance enhancement), individual bio-system correction, re-setting the body clock, synchronisation of body and mind, and techniques to combat repetitive strain injury (RSI). "Basically, the course is geared to improve the body metabolism so that it responds to situations appropriately. We have yoga exercises as well as exercises that are similar to yoga. Before I admit anyone, I send him or her to a doctor to get an assessment of problems. Based on the report, I design the fitness regime for each individual," says Jose.

The course concentrates on eliminating RSI, a frequent complaint these days. February 28 was International RSI Day, says Jose, adding that the RSI Week was observed till February 27 at the ITPL in which experts on physical fitness conducted workshops for professionals.

Fitness Force admits not more than 25 people at a time so as to ensure personal attention.

For details, contact Fitness Force at 22-23, Kamadhenu Annexe, Trinity Circle. Ph: 25546008/ 98451-64750. E-mail: forcetec@vsnl.com

G.N.P.

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Entertainment | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | The Sportstar | Frontline | The Hindu eBooks | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2004, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu