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Fruitful FINALE

Want to know about the fineries behind the finale of the Lakme India Fashion Week? Read on with ANUJ KUMAR.



THE SHOCK SMITHS: Designers Arora Sen and Aki Narula who will interpret the Lakme Fashion statement along with Anamika Khanna at the finale of LIFW. — Photos: S. Subaramanium

FRUITS, FASHION and finale, if figuring out a link between the three gives you a shock, you have arrived at the missing link. Yes, "Fruit Shock" is the fashion statement of the Grand Finale of India Fashion Week that the three young designers, Aki Narula, Anshu Arora Sen and Anamika Khanna are going to interpret for the chief sponsor Lakme this evening as pop, crush and burst respectively.

"In the past the finale look has been very couture. This year we are presenting a youthful, energetic look. That is why we have chosen younger designers who can interpret our statement," says Anil Chopra, Business Head, Lakme Lever.

"My collection has a feminine look of the `50s with red and fuchsia being the premier colours," says Aki Narula. As for the fruit connection, he is working on the stain aspect of fruits. "When you crush a strawberry or watermelon on an outfit, the splash you get on it is my interpretation." Aki who brought the casual fashion to Bollywood with Dil Chahta Hai and is now working to create a more relaxed look with short sneakers and ganjis on celluloid in Aishwarya and Vivek Oberoi starrer Kyon Ho Gaya Na, is using chiffons, knits and georgettes and no embellishments unmindful of the fall winter theme of the Week. "I have to take into account my interests in Mumbai and Kolkata as well."

Though Anshu argues that the connection between fruits and fashion should not be made literally, she is construing her pop theme with pop culture. "Mine is a fun collection with emphasis on pink shades keeping in mind the trendy feel." Anshu emphasises that hers is a wearable collection and association with the company hasn't limited her creativity. Going with the trend, both the designers are concentrating on skirts but while Anshu's silhouettes have a geometric pattern (which she calls the bubble gum look), Aki's have an element of sportswear. "I have tried to give tops, a T-shirt touch," says he.

The designers are being paid an honorarium by the company and they are not minding being the last to show during the Week, considering buyers rush to designers after watching the show only. "It's not mathematics. Buyers come after a lot of research and if my works interest them they will contact me after the Week," responds Anshu.



The shockers... Models Katrina Kaif, Yana Gupta and Uma Chiplunkar ready for the finale.

Talking of the company's association with the Week, Chopra observes that since clothes and cosmetics go together, FDCI approached Lakme, which holds 50 per cent of the market. "We also felt that like ready-to-wear clothes, we also offer quality products at affordable prices." As for the figures, Chopra points out, "We have made a 32 per cent growth, out of which 26 per cent is because of the products that were launched during the Week." But then the company launches its collection with the Week. This year's Summer collection includes enrich lip colours in 10 shades, true wear nail enamel with a glossy summer look, shimmer eye cubes in three shades and liquid blush.

With Lakme emphasising vibrant shades like fuchsia, berry and plum putting the brownish tones totally out; the designer options seem limited considering beige shades appear to be in demand in the coming season. Interestingly, they appear unconcerned. "If the silhouettes are good, these things do not matter," answers Anshu.

Adds Corey Walia, make up artist, associated with the project, "The young generation is ready to experiment and is not afraid to use blue tones around eyes. We are using real extracts of papaya, orange and mango in our products to enrich them with vitamins because after all it is the sale that counts." Chopra assures though they follow international trends but keep in mind the requirements of Indian skin and hair colour and do not test on animals. Wanna proof? Yana, Katrina and Indrani. More than wholesome.

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