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Meditate and be well



Kochhar A... Healing with care.

ENTER FOURTH Dimension's meditation room. A quiet room with no distractions, it offers an ergonomically designed chair, specially composed music, soothing blue hues and the aroma of herbal oils. It seems to be the ideal place to start a journey to a new level of relaxation and awareness.

Why meditation? The idea came to Kochhar A., during his teenage years when he read the works of Swami Vivekananda and later despite his engineering background, entered the creative field of photography and visual arts. But creativity has no boundaries, so apart from designing customised

furniture, using top quality Burma teak, Kochhar attempts to touch the five senses through his meditation room concept.

He elaborates further on why meditation: "In the present day `rush' situation, we have forgotten our soul in the quest for materialistic fulfilment. We have places to reach at a frenzied pace and more often than not, this does not balance with one's body, so it is stressful. No. I'm not into promoting religion, only peace of mind through the art of meditation, a harmony of five senses - touch, sight, smell, hearing and taste. Once these are in sync, you are in the depth of timelessness,

comparable with Shunya, `zero' or emptiness in Sanskrit, a complete solution for peace."

Kochhar's meditation room has a comfortable chair to sink into, as he suggests that you ideally sit to meditate. For the sense of touch, the feel of the chair is relaxing with arms, shoulders and feet being completely at ease. For the sense of sight, the room is lit up with a serene bluish tinge of sea green. For the sense of smell, Kochhar uses natural oils - sandal, lemon, and lavender. He even mixes two or more oils depending upon the person's requirements. Oils are also chosen according to the season and zodiac signs. For the sense of hearing, the meditation room is equipped with a CD player playing soothing, lilting music that is constant except for the changing rhythms. Sitar, santoor and flute are what he prefers, but again the choice of music will depend upon the user's personality. For the sense of taste, Kochhar provides silver coated elaichi to be had in the meditation room. He feels that this can be compared to the Prasad we have in our temples. The meditation room is thus fully equipped for energizing all five senses for the purpose of relaxation and self-realization.

There are moments when we may feel particularly tense and stressed out. It is at these times that we need to stop what we are doing and take a break, when our bodies need the most attention, when breathing is quick, muscles tight and strained with high tension. Kochhar prefers to call meditation, relaxation, conscious relaxation, and chosen relaxation. These are words that are universally understood.

Meditating is actually easier than you imagine, especially in a room earmarked for it. You start by paying attention to your breathing. The practical effort to focus completely on breathing takes the mind away from the `clutter' that constantly tries to invade your mind and eliminates feelings that will lead to calm and peace. With repeated effort, the goal of clearing your mind - to think of nothing - does occur, and the process of meditation takes on its own energy. Natural light is a must for a meditation room, be it in the office or at home. There are no ideal, hard and fast rules for meditation.

"Do it whenever it suits" says Kochhar, "Either before office or after the day's work is over."

A meditation room can be designed in various fashions: European, Chinese, Japanese or Indian.

"I want to break barriers, as we live in a global society." At home, ideally the meditation room should be combined with a steam room, so that the pores can be fully opened for further wellness benefits. The room is equally beneficial in corporate surroundings, to ease the pressures and stress of senior executives.

How does one meditate? "Sit comfortably, close your eyes for breathing exercises and let go. Be there as long as you enjoy it, do not force yourself." There is no right or wrong behaviour during meditation. "It is a self-care activity and everyone deserves this kind of break. Peace, joy and positive energy, something money can't buy," says Kochhar.

SUMITRA SENAPATY

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