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Baddie cool

Meet the versatile Rajat Bedi who can play a cop as well as an anti-hero with equal ιlan



Photo: Mohd. Yousuf

THE BAD man of the Indian cinema is no more a fiery Pran, a scheming Ranjeet or a comic Paresh Rawal. He is a good-looking anti-hero with a well toned chiselled body and macho looks, who has walked the ramp before entering celluloid. A case in point is Rajat Bedi, the first Gladrags (1994) titleholder, who did an equally commendable job playing baddie Raj Saxena in Koi Mil Gaya.

"I think I have been quite successful. Every child recognises me now. It is more challenging to play a villain than playing a hero. The part of a villain is performance-oriented," says Rajat Bedi who was in town recently.

After making his debut with Tabu in Do Hazaar Ek as a hero he has played diverse roles since then, from a positive-negative role in Kukku Kohli's Yeh Dil Aashiqana, underworld don Munna Bhai in Ansh, to a cop in his forthcoming Suniel Shetty, Dino Morea, Bipasha Basu multi-starrer Rakht, and a lead negative, this time in a Tamil flick, Suresh Krishna's Gajendra.

"I guess I can fit into positive and negative roles equally well owing to my looks and flair for acting. As for the latter, I grew up watching my father and grandfather making films. My father Narendra Bedi directed some of the classic hits of the Seventies and Eighties such as Khotey Sikkey and Raffu Chakker. While my grandfather Rajendra Singh Bedi has written excellent films like Ek Chadar Maili Si and Abhimaan," he says. So it does not come as a surprise when he talks of starting his own home production, which kicks off with Padmashree Laloo Prasad Yadav.

"Padmashree Laloo Prasad Yadav is a total fun film about four people Padmashree, that in fact happens to be a girl (played by Masoomi), Laloo (Suniel Shetty), Prasad (Mahesh Manjrekar) and Yadav (Johnny Lever).

It looks like Kaante and was shot in South Africa. The film is slated for an August release. There are two more home productions where I play the lead," he explains.

Is there a specific role that he would like to play? "One with a lot of cable stunts . I am very good with action and definitely looking forward to such roles coming my way. Also, I am looking at the southern film industry. I am already working in Tamil films. I will be meeting Ramanaidu and other filmmakers here," he says.

Keep looking out for the macho villain at the screen near your house then. As the adage goes, if looks could kill...

SYEDA FARIDA

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