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Silent waves, still waters

Sabiha Sumar's much-acclaimed "Khamosh Pani" finally makes a splash in the Capital this Friday.



Kirron Kher joins hand with Navtej Joher and Amir Malik in "Khamosh Pani" releasing this week.

AFTER MAKING waves across the world, Khamosh Pani is due to make a splash at the silver screen in India this week. And none is happier than Kirron Kher who has already won the Best Actress award for the role of Ayesha, a woman left behind in Pakistan at the time of the Partition. Directed by Sabiha Sumar, Khamosh Pani has won 14 international awards, including Best Film - Golden Leopard, Festival Grand Prize, Locarno - Best Actress and Best Direction.

Says Kirron Kher, "This role is closest to my heart. It has taken me back to the roots. Actually, this role of Ayesha took its toll on me emotionally. After the shooting I had to take recourse to music to unwind."

Long years

Talking of shooting, informs debutante director Sabiha, the film was conceptualised in 1996. She took full eight years before the Khamosh Pani attained the shape where the cinemagoers could empathise with the plight of women, of women exploited in 1947, and reliving the trauma all over again as democracy gave way to dictatorship in Pakistan.


"The film talks of the exploitation of women. Though the setting is in the sub-continent, it could actually be anywhere. When we started shooting in the late 1990s, we had to stop midway due to lack of finances. We resumed a year later but met with the same result. In 2001, 9/11 happened. The film was finally completed in 2002," reveals Sabiha, about the film that has attracted a lot of positive vibes in Pakistan. "Everywhere I have shown the film, people have given us a positive feedback," says Sabiha, born in Karachi, and a seasoned documentary filmmaker who has used her works to sensitise people to the plight of women.

Yes, as this film hits the cinema halls across Delhi and Gurgaon this week, do take some time out to realise there is more to Punjabi music, films and culture than just Bhangra. Khamosh Pani takes us to the times when it was not easy to be a woman. It brings us to the times when it is, again, not easy to be a woman.

ZIYA US SALAM

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