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Delivering solutions

"Home Delivery" is a clean comedy delivered to family audiences, vouches Vivek Oberoi as he shares his "mischievous-self" with RANA SIDDIQUI


People often tell me that I do so much for others, but I beg to differ. I do it for myself, for my happiness VIVEK OBEROI



AAPKE GHAR TAK Vivek Oberoi plays a "celebrated journo" in Sujoy Ghosh's film "Home Delivery"

There rests a little success where there is a little laughter, they say. But bringing a smile to someone's life with dedicated efforts is not an easy task. Talking of Bollywood particularly, we have an array of actors turning into people's representatives in the Parliament, but not many have been able to bring a smile to their voters' faces.

But there are some whose films may not become instant hits but they remain dear to people for their efforts for the man on the street. And that's why, when a scribe gets to meet them, a query about their social work always forms a part of the questionnaire.

Actor Vivek Oberoi is one such personality who gained respect among journalists for his social work in the wake of last year's tsunami disaster.

The immediate occasion to chat with him though is his film Home Delivery which is already creating a lot of buzz both because of its unusual title and the promos.

An out-and-out comedy film, Home Delivery is all about a "celebrated journo" played by Vivek who is an "Agony Uncle" in a column that he writes for a newspaper and fantasises about an actress played by Mahima Choudhary. Boman Irani plays a pizza deliveryman who invariably ends up solving the problem of those households where he delivers pizzas, and knowing Vivek's wish, delivers Mahima in a pizza box at his house. Oberoi's fiancée in the film, played by Ayesha Takia, is the other attraction of the storyline.

Mahima in a box

"I play a celebrated journo in the film whose quick answers, convincing power and wit are his strengths. I become more famous as I get an offer from a celebrated director Karan Johar to write the script of his next film. I con people at every step into believing me. My editor, played by Juhi Chawla, takes all my tantrums and she even takes in her stride my late arrival at the office only because she thinks the paper is running only because of my column. The problems start when a pizza delivery man home-delivers my dream actress Mahim Choudhury in a box," says Vivek who promises the film is a neat and clean comedy, which will bring no embarrassment if seen with family.

The film may be devoid of embarrassment but Vivek is known for bringing lots of it to his co- actors.

He admits, "I played a fast one with Ayesha on the sets this time."

"A portrait of an old lady hangs on a wall in the film. I whispered to Ayesha that the portrait was looking awful and it shouldn't be there. A gullible Ayesha intimated it to the art director Mansi saying she wanted it to change. Mansi wasn't in a condition to replace it so she sulkily said, she would try. For three days, it kept happening. On the fourth day, I asked Ayesha why she told it to Mansi? She is sulking because it was her mother's portrait! A shocked Ayesha rushed with apologies to Mansi only to find her adamant on replacing that now. Ayesha apologised saying, `I didn't know it was your mother.' A shocked Mansi retorted, `Who told you this is my mother. I don't even know her? First, you call someone awful, then label her as my mother... ' And Ayesha was after my life for the rest of the shoot," laughs Vivek.

And he spreads tshis laughter in many lives through his NGO, Yashodhara Foundation for the benefit of cancer patients under which he has recently initiated a programme `Angels for Angels' through which he will sponsor heart operations of underprivileged children.

"I have already tied up with Apollo Hospitals. Naresh Trehan of Escorts Hospital has also supported this cause," says a visibly happy Vivek.

Under this programme, four children have already been successfully operated upon, he informs. His Foundation also helps the rehabilitation of the mentally challenged, physically and sexually abused children. "People often tell me that I do so much for others, but I beg to differ. I do it for myself, for my happiness," he says.

Future projects

In films though, he still doesn't have any specific image.

"I am trying to prove myself as a decent actor," he says. He is trying to "improve on dialogue delivery" too.

And next in his kitty are "a hilarious comedy" Pyaare Mohan by Indra Kumar and Naqsha by Sachin Bajaj, an action-oriented film.

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