Online edition of India's National Newspaper
Saturday, Aug 12, 2006
Google



Metro Plus Kochi
Published on Mondays & Thursdays

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Friday Review | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |

Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Mangalore    Pondicherry    Tiruchirapalli    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Printer Friendly Page Send this Article to a Friend

Return of the diva

Anaida makes a comeback to the music charts with her fifth album, `Nayaa'


There is simply nothing and nowhere quite like India ANAIDA



ENCHANTING SONGSTRESS Anaida sets the stage on fire

Here's an artiste who can team up with Baba Sehgal and Petre Andre with equal poise. And at the same time created a flutter among viewers with an Arabic O Mailu Mailu and a pop Oova Oova. The Eurasian artiste did not stop at that as she crooned into hearts of filmgoers with her Hakuna Matata (Lion King), OST for Bombay Boys and Bollywood flicks. The diva returns with her fifth album - Nayaa.

"Nayaa is a journey of love. It's about new sounds with an emotional flavour. There are songs I have written and composed. I have worked with many different people over the years and many have become good friends. It's always a wonderful experience to work with other talent," says Anaida. Flavoured with dance, club, lounge, commercial and R&B, the album lines up a good deal of contemporary beat from the artiste. "I also did numerous projects abroad including a song for Buddha Bar. Time and again I have done lounge music but mainly on the international scene. Currently there is a song for Cafe Delmar compilation that I maybe doing. One of the producers I worked with before is keen to re do one of my existing compositions in a lounge style," she explains.

Current trends

Reflecting the current trend in the music realm, "the non-Bollywood music industry is poised at an edge. In the past pop was pop and film music was film. Now film has gone pop, every old film song is remade with western pop beats and there is hardly a differentiation. There is also a shortage of original music. But I think saturation is good; it would make people crave for something new. And I hope Nayaa caters to that. I also think there isn't enough support for non-film music. There is no way pop can compete with films financially or in terms of reach, add to that the music channels and radio channels that concentrate mainly on films. Producing an album on your own with no backing is no easy task. For a new comer it would be next to impossible," she reflects.

As regards forthcoming Bollywood projects, "I'd be open to doing songs for films the way it is done abroad - take the situation and create a song for them. But now and then I have sung for films and when I like the songs I still do." She adds, "India is my home. I do think that living in this country is like nowhere else in the world. There is simply nothing and nowhere quite like it."

SYEDA FARIDA

Printer friendly page  
Send this article to Friends by E-Mail



Metro Plus    Bangalore    Chennai    Coimbatore    Delhi    Hyderabad    Kochi    Madurai    Mangalore    Pondicherry    Tiruchirapalli    Thiruvananthapuram    Vijayawada    Visakhapatnam   

Features: Magazine | Literary Review | Life | Metro Plus | Open Page | Education Plus | Book Review | Business | SciTech | Friday Review | Young World | Property Plus | Quest | Folio |


The Hindu Group: Home | About Us | Copyright | Archives | Contacts | Subscription
Group Sites: The Hindu | Business Line | Sportstar | Frontline | Publications | eBooks | Images | Home |

Comments to : thehindu@vsnl.com   Copyright 2006, The Hindu
Republication or redissemination of the contents of this screen are expressly prohibited without the written consent of The Hindu